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Climatic Change

, Volume 110, Issue 1–2, pp 227–248 | Cite as

Facilitating adaptation of biodiversity to climate change: a conceptual framework applied to the world’s largest Mediterranean-climate woodland

  • Suzanne M. Prober
  • Kevin R. Thiele
  • Philip W. Rundel
  • Colin J. Yates
  • Sandra L. Berry
  • Margaret Byrne
  • Les Christidis
  • Carl R. Gosper
  • Pauline F. Grierson
  • Kristina Lemson
  • Tom Lyons
  • Craig Macfarlane
  • Michael H. O’Connor
  • John K. Scott
  • Rachel J. Standish
  • William D. Stock
  • Eddie J. B. van Etten
  • Grant W. Wardell-Johnson
  • Alexander Watson
Article

Abstract

The importance of ecological management for reducing the vulnerability of biodiversity to climate change is increasingly recognized, yet frameworks to facilitate a structured approach to climate adaptation management are lacking. We developed a conceptual framework that can guide identification of climate change impacts and adaptive management options in a given region or biome. The framework focuses on potential points of early climate change impact, and organizes these along two main axes. First, it recognizes that climate change can act at a range of ecological scales. Secondly, it emphasizes that outcomes are dependent on two potentially interacting and countervailing forces: (1) changes to environmental parameters and ecological processes brought about by climate change, and (2) responses of component systems as determined by attributes of resistance and resilience. Through this structure, the framework draws together a broad range of ecological concepts, with a novel emphasis on attributes of resistance and resilience that can temper the response of species, ecosystems and landscapes to climate change. We applied the framework to the world’s largest remaining Mediterranean-climate woodland, the ‘Great Western Woodlands’ of south-western Australia. In this relatively intact region, maintaining inherent resistance and resilience by preventing anthropogenic degradation is of highest priority and lowest risk. Limited, higher risk options such as fire management, protection of refugia and translocation of adaptive genes may be justifiable under more extreme change, hence our capacity to predict the extent of change strongly impinges on such management decisions. These conclusions may contrast with similar analyses in degraded landscapes, where natural integrity is already compromised, and existing investment in restoration may facilitate experimentation with higher risk options.

Keywords

Climate Change Climate Change Impact Adaptation Option Fire Management Eucalypt Woodland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Crown Copyright 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne M. Prober
    • 1
  • Kevin R. Thiele
    • 2
  • Philip W. Rundel
    • 3
  • Colin J. Yates
    • 2
  • Sandra L. Berry
    • 4
  • Margaret Byrne
    • 2
  • Les Christidis
    • 5
  • Carl R. Gosper
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pauline F. Grierson
    • 6
  • Kristina Lemson
    • 7
  • Tom Lyons
    • 8
  • Craig Macfarlane
    • 1
  • Michael H. O’Connor
    • 1
  • John K. Scott
    • 1
  • Rachel J. Standish
    • 6
  • William D. Stock
    • 7
  • Eddie J. B. van Etten
    • 7
  • Grant W. Wardell-Johnson
    • 9
  • Alexander Watson
    • 10
  1. 1.CSIRO Climate Adaptation National Research Flagship and CSIRO Ecosystem SciencesPO WembleyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Environment and Conservation, Science Division, LMB 104Bentley Delivery CentrePerthAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Fenner School of Environment and SocietyThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia
  5. 5.National Marine Science CentreSouthern Cross UniversityCoffs HarbourAustralia
  6. 6.School of Plant BiologyUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  7. 7.Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Natural SciencesEdith Cowan UniversityJoondalupAustralia
  8. 8.Centre of Excellence for Climate Change Woodland and Forest Health, School of Environmental ScienceMurdoch UniversityMurdochAustralia
  9. 9.Curtin Institute for Biodiversity and ClimateCurtin UniversityPerthAustralia
  10. 10.The Wilderness Society, City West Lotteries HouseWest PerthAustralia

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