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Climatic Change

, Volume 105, Issue 3–4, pp 529–553 | Cite as

Developing carbon budgets for UK agriculture, land-use, land-use change and forestry out to 2022

  • Dominic MoranEmail author
  • Michael MacLeod
  • Eileen Wall
  • Vera Eory
  • Alistair McVittie
  • Andrew Barnes
  • R. M. Rees
  • Cairistiona F. E. Topp
  • Guillaume Pajot
  • Robin Matthews
  • Pete Smith
  • Andrew Moxey
Article

Abstract

This paper derives a notional future carbon budget for UK agriculture, land use, land use change and forestry sectors (ALULUCF). The budget is based on a bottom-up marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) derived for a range of mitigation measures for specified adoption scenarios for the years 2012, 2017 and 2022. The results indicate that in 2022 around 6.36 MtCO2e could be abated at negative or zero cost. Furthermore, in the same year, over 17% of agricultural GHG emissions (7.85 MtCO2e) could be abated at a cost of less than the 2022 Shadow Price of Carbon (£34 (tCO2e) − 1). The development of robust MACCs faces a range of methodological hurdles that complicate cost-effectiveness appraisal in ALULUCF relative to other sectors. Nevertheless, the current analysis provides an initial route map of efficient measures for mitigation in UK agriculture.

Keywords

Anaerobic Digestion Mitigation Potential Social Discount Rate Abatement Measure Marginal Abatement Cost Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dominic Moran
    • 1
    Email author
  • Michael MacLeod
    • 1
  • Eileen Wall
    • 1
  • Vera Eory
    • 1
  • Alistair McVittie
    • 1
  • Andrew Barnes
    • 1
  • R. M. Rees
    • 1
  • Cairistiona F. E. Topp
    • 1
  • Guillaume Pajot
    • 2
  • Robin Matthews
    • 2
  • Pete Smith
    • 3
  • Andrew Moxey
    • 4
  1. 1.SACEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Macaulay InstituteAberdeenUK
  3. 3.University of AberdeenAberdeenUK
  4. 4.Pareto ConsultingEdinburghUK

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