Climatic Change

, Volume 102, Issue 1–2, pp 351–376 | Cite as

Preparing for climate change in Washington State

  • Lara C. Whitely Binder
  • Jennifer Krencicki Barcelos
  • Derek B. Booth
  • Meriel Darzen
  • Marketa McGuire Elsner
  • Richard Fenske
  • Thomas F. Graham
  • Alan F. Hamlet
  • John Hodges-Howell
  • J. Elizabeth Jackson
  • Catherine Karr
  • Patrick W. Keys
  • Jeremy S. Littell
  • Nathan Mantua
  • Jennifer Marlow
  • Don McKenzie
  • Michael Robinson-Dorn
  • Eric A. Rosenberg
  • Claudio O. Stöckle
  • Julie A. Vano
Article

Abstract

Climate change is expected to bring potentially significant changes to Washington State’s natural, institutional, cultural, and economic landscape. Addressing climate change impacts will require a sustained commitment to integrating climate information into the day-to-day governance and management of infrastructure, programs, and services that may be affected by climate change. This paper discusses fundamental concepts for planning for climate change and identifies options for adapting to the climate impacts evaluated in the Washington Climate Change Impacts Assessment. Additionally, the paper highlights potential avenues for increasing flexibility in the policies and regulations used to govern human and natural systems in Washington.

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Copyright information

© U.S. Government 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lara C. Whitely Binder
    • 1
  • Jennifer Krencicki Barcelos
    • 2
  • Derek B. Booth
    • 3
  • Meriel Darzen
    • 2
  • Marketa McGuire Elsner
    • 1
  • Richard Fenske
    • 4
  • Thomas F. Graham
    • 2
  • Alan F. Hamlet
    • 5
  • John Hodges-Howell
    • 2
  • J. Elizabeth Jackson
    • 6
  • Catherine Karr
    • 7
  • Patrick W. Keys
    • 5
  • Jeremy S. Littell
    • 1
  • Nathan Mantua
    • 1
  • Jennifer Marlow
    • 2
  • Don McKenzie
    • 8
  • Michael Robinson-Dorn
    • 2
  • Eric A. Rosenberg
    • 5
  • Claudio O. Stöckle
    • 9
  • Julie A. Vano
    • 5
  1. 1.JISAO/CSES Climate Impacts GroupUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Kathy and Steve Berman Environmental Law ClinicUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Stillwater ConsultantsBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Environmental and Occupational Health SciencesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  6. 6.School of Public Health and Community MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  7. 7.Department of PediatricsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  8. 8.College of Forest ResourcesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  9. 9.Department of Biological Systems EngineeringWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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