Climatic Change

, Volume 105, Issue 3–4, pp 627–634

Topographically modified tree-ring chronologies as a potential means to improve paleoclimate inference

A letter
  • Andrew G. Bunn
  • Malcolm K. Hughes
  • Matthew W. Salzer
Letter

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew G. Bunn
    • 1
  • Malcolm K. Hughes
    • 2
  • Matthew W. Salzer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Sciences, Huxley CollegeWestern Washington UniversityBellinghamUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Tree-Ring ResearchUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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