Climatic Change

, Volume 106, Issue 1, pp 93–127

Developing coastal adaptation to climate change in the New York City infrastructure-shed: process, approach, tools, and strategies

  • Cynthia Rosenzweig
  • William D. Solecki
  • Reginald Blake
  • Malcolm Bowman
  • Craig Faris
  • Vivien Gornitz
  • Radley Horton
  • Klaus Jacob
  • Alice LeBlanc
  • Robin Leichenko
  • Megan Linkin
  • David Major
  • Megan O’Grady
  • Lesley Patrick
  • Edna Sussman
  • Gary Yohe
  • Rae Zimmerman
Article

Abstract

While current rates of sea level rise and associated coastal flooding in the New York City region appear to be manageable by stakeholders responsible for communications, energy, transportation, and water infrastructure, projections for sea level rise and associated flooding in the future, especially those associated with rapid icemelt of the Greenland and West Antarctic Icesheets, may be outside the range of current capacity because extreme events might cause flooding beyond today’s planning and preparedness regimes. This paper describes the comprehensive process, approach, and tools for adaptation developed by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) in conjunction with the region’s stakeholders who manage its critical infrastructure, much of which lies near the coast. It presents the adaptation framework and the sea-level rise and storm projections related to coastal risks developed through the stakeholder process. Climate change adaptation planning in New York City is characterized by a multi-jurisdictional stakeholder–scientist process, state-of-the-art scientific projections and mapping, and development of adaptation strategies based on a risk-management approach.

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Copyright information

© U.S. Government 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia Rosenzweig
    • 1
  • William D. Solecki
    • 2
  • Reginald Blake
    • 3
  • Malcolm Bowman
    • 4
  • Craig Faris
    • 5
  • Vivien Gornitz
    • 6
  • Radley Horton
    • 6
  • Klaus Jacob
    • 6
  • Alice LeBlanc
  • Robin Leichenko
    • 7
  • Megan Linkin
    • 8
  • David Major
    • 6
  • Megan O’Grady
    • 6
  • Lesley Patrick
    • 2
  • Edna Sussman
    • 9
  • Gary Yohe
    • 10
  • Rae Zimmerman
    • 11
  1. 1.NASA Goddard Institute for Space StudiesNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Hunter College of City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.City University of New YorkNew York City College of TechnologyBrooklynUSA
  4. 4.State University of New YorkStony BrookStony BrookUSA
  5. 5.AccentureWashington, D.C.USA
  6. 6.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Rutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  8. 8.Swiss Reinsurance America CorporationArmonkUSA
  9. 9.Sussman ADRLLCNew YorkUSA
  10. 10.Wesleyan UniversityMiddletownUSA
  11. 11.New York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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