Climatic Change

, Volume 87, Issue 3–4, pp 305–320 | Cite as

Biosphere carbon stock management: addressing the threat of abrupt climate change in the next few decades: an editorial essay

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Energy Research, Institute for Technology and EngineeringMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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