Climatic Change

, Volume 87, Supplement 1, pp 91–108 | Cite as

Progress on incorporating climate change into management of California’s water resources

  • Jamie Anderson
  • Francis Chung
  • Michael Anderson
  • Levi Brekke
  • Daniel Easton
  • Messele Ejeta
  • Roy Peterson
  • Richard Snyder
Article

Abstract

This paper presents preliminary efforts by agencies managing California’s water resources to incorporate climate change research into their planning and management tools. Projected increases in air temperature may lead to changes in the precipitation patterns, runoff timing and volume, sea level rise, and changes in the amount of irrigation water needed due to modified evapotranspiration rates. Historical observations of climate change related to California’s water resources are shown. Results from preliminary modeling studies of potential impacts of climate change to operations of the State Water Project and Central Valley Project, Delta water quality and water levels, flood forecasting and evapotranspiration rates are presented. Future directions to incorporate risk assessment are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamie Anderson
    • 1
  • Francis Chung
    • 1
  • Michael Anderson
    • 1
  • Levi Brekke
    • 2
  • Daniel Easton
    • 1
  • Messele Ejeta
    • 1
  • Roy Peterson
    • 1
  • Richard Snyder
    • 3
  1. 1.California Department of Water ResourcesSacramentoUSA
  2. 2.US Bureau of Reclamation, Technical Service CenterDenverUSA
  3. 3.Department of Land, Air and Water ResourcesUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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