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Climatic Change

, Volume 88, Issue 1, pp 21–34 | Cite as

Climate, development and malaria: an application of FUND

  • Richard S. J. TolEmail author
Article

Abstract

Climate change may well increase malaria morbidity and mortality. This would slow economic growth through increased spending on health care, reduced production, and less effective education. Slower economic growth would increase the incidence of malaria morbidity and mortality. The integrated assessment model FUND is used to estimate the strength of this negative feedback. Although climate-change-induced health problems may well substantially affect the projected growth path of developing regions, it is unlikely that climate change would reverse economic growth due to the impacts considered here. Even in sub-Saharan Africa, an area thought to be very sensitive to climate change and associated health effect, the impact, while detectable, is small and unlikely to reverse economic growth.

Keywords

Malaria Capita Income Climate Change Impact Schistosomiasis Climate Sensitivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Economic and Social Research InstituteDublinIreland
  2. 2.Institute for Environmental StudiesVrije UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Dept. Engineering and Public PolicyCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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