Climatic Change

, Volume 86, Issue 1–2, pp 105–122

Interdependencies of urban climate change impacts and adaptation strategies: a case study of Metropolitan Boston USA

Article

Abstract

An analysis of the interdependencies of the impacts of climate change and adaptation strategies upon infrastructure systems in the Metro Boston urban area in the northeastern USA found that taking anticipatory actions well before 2050 results in less total adaptation and impact costs to the region than taking no actions. Because of the interrelations among infrastructure systems, it is critical to take account of the impacts that adaptation actions have on each other and other systems. For the most part these cross-system effects are complementary in nature. But there are important exceptions, so an integrated approach to adaptation policy formulation is needed. Furthermore, adaptation efforts must be designed so as not to confound mitigation efforts.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amato A, Ruth M, Kirshen P, Horwtiz J (2005) Regional energy demand responses to climate change: methodology and application to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Clim Change 71:175–201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baethgen W, Barros V, Burton I, Canziani O, Downing T, Klein R, Leary N, Malpede D, Marengo J, Mearns L, Lasco R, Wandiga S (2004) Science in support of adaptation to climate change, http://www.aiaccproject.org/whats_new/Science_and_Adaptation.pdf, December 7
  3. Bloomfield J, Smith M, Thompson N (1999) Hot nights in the city: global warming, sea-level rise and the New York metropolitan region. Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  4. Easterling W, Hurd B, Smith J (2004) Coping with climate change. The role of adaptation in the United States. Pew Center in Global Climate Change, JuneGoogle Scholar
  5. Hayhoe K, Wake C, Huntington T, Luo L, Schwartz M, Sheffield J, Wood E, Anderson B, Bradbury J, Degaetano A, Troy T, Wolfe D (2007) Past and future changes in climate and hydrological indicators in the U.S. Northeast. Clim Dyn (in press)Google Scholar
  6. Holman IP, Rounsevell M, Shackley S, Harrison P, Nichols R, Berry P, Audsley E (2005a) A regional, multi-sectoral and integrated assessment of the impacts of climate and socio-economic change in the UK, part I, methodology. Clim Change 71:9–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Holman IP, Nichols R, Berry P, Harrison P, Audsley E, Shackley S, Rounsevell M (2005b) A regional, multi-sectoral and integrated assessment of the impacts of climate and socio-economic change in the UK, part II, results. Clim Change 71:43–73CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Hoo W, Sumitani M (2005) Climate change will impact the Seattle Department of Transportation. Office of the City Auditor, Seattle, WAGoogle Scholar
  9. Jollands N, Andrew R, Ruth M, Ahmad S, London M, Lennox J, Bartleet M (2006) Climate’s long-term impacts on New Zealand infrastructure, phase II report, Wellington City case study, New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Center for Integrative Environmental Research. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA, AugustGoogle Scholar
  10. Jollands N, Ruth M, Bernier C, Golubiewski N, Andrewm R, Forgie V (2005) Climate’s long-term impacts on New Zealand infrastructure, phase 1 report, Hamilton City case study, New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Center for Integrative Environmental Research. University of Maryland, College Park, MA, USA, JulyGoogle Scholar
  11. Kirshen P, Edgers L, Edelmann J, Percher M, Bettencourt B, Lewandowski E, Limbrunner J (2002) A case study of the possible effects of climate change on bridge scour. In: Proceedings of first international conference on scour of foundations, Texas A&M University, College Station TX, 17–20 NovemberGoogle Scholar
  12. Kirshen P, Ruth M, Anderson W, Lakshmanan TR (2004) Infrastructure systems, services and climate change: integrated impacts and response strategies for the Boston Metropolitan area, final report to US EPA ORD, EPA grant number: R.827450-01Google Scholar
  13. Kirshen P, Ruth M, Anderson W (2006) Climate’s long-term impacts on urban infrastructures and services: the case of Metro Boston, chapter 7. In: Ruth M, Donaghy K, Kirshen PH (eds) Climate change and variability: local impacts and responses. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, EnglandGoogle Scholar
  14. Koteen L, Bloomfield J, Eichler T, Tonne C, Young R, Poulshock H, Sosler A (2001) Hot prospects: the potential impacts of global warming on Los Angeles and the Southland. Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  15. Metropolitan Area Planning Council (1998) Long-term demographic and employment forecasts, 2025. MAPC, Boston, MAGoogle Scholar
  16. New England Regional Assessment Group (2001) Preparing for a changing climate: the potential consequences of climate variability and change, New England Regional Overview; US Global Change Research Program. University of New HampshireGoogle Scholar
  17. NPA Data Services, Inc. (1999) Regional economic projections series, demographic/household databases: three growth projectionsGoogle Scholar
  18. Rosenzweig C, Solecki W, Paine C, Gornitz V, Hartig E, Jacob K, Major D, Kinney P, Hill D, Zimmerman R (2000) Climate change and a global city: an assessment of the Metropolitan East Coast Region, The U.S. national assessment of the potential consequences of climate variability and change, U.S. Global Change Research Program, http://metroeast_climate.ciesin.columbia.edu/
  19. Ruth M, Kirshen P (2001) Integrated impacts of climate change upon infrastructure systems and services in the Boston Metropolitan area. World Resour Rev 13(1):106–122Google Scholar
  20. Ruth M, Amato A, Kirshen P (2006) Impacts of changing temperatures on heat-related mortality in urban areas: the issues and a case study from Metropolitan Boston. In: Ruth M (ed) Smart growth and climate change: regional development, infrastructure and adaptation. Eward Elgar, Cheltenham, England, pp 364–392Google Scholar
  21. Ruth M, Bernier C, Jollands N (2007) Adaptation of urban water supply infrastructure to impacts from climate and socioeconomic changes: the case of Hamilton, New Zealand. Water Resour Manag (in press)Google Scholar
  22. Sanayei M, Edgers L, Alonge J, Kirshen P (2003) Effects of increased wind loads on a tall building. Civ Eng Pract 18(2)Google Scholar
  23. Suarez P, Anderson W, Mahal V, Lakshmanan TR (2005) Impacts of flooding and climate change on urban transportation. A systemwide performance assessment of the Boston Metro area. Transportation Research Part D (10)Google Scholar
  24. Vogel R, Shallcross A (1996) The moving blocks bootstrap versus parametric time series models. Water Resour Res 32(6):1875–1882CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Working Group I, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2001) Climate change 2001, the scientific basis. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  26. Yohe G, Schlesinger M (2002) The economic geography of the impacts of climate change. J Econ Geogr 2(3):311–341CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Anderson HallTufts UniversityMedfordUSA
  2. 2.School of Public Policy and Center for Integrative Environmental ResearchUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Geography and Center for Transportation StudiesBoston UniversityBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations