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Language Resources and Evaluation

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Plagiarism and authorship analysis: introduction to the special issue

  • Efstathios Stamatatos
  • Moshe Koppel
Article

Authorship attribution and plagiarism analysis

The Internet has facilitated both the dissemination of anonymous texts as well as easy “borrowing” of ideas and words of others. This has raised a number of important questions regarding authorship. Can we identify the anonymous author of a text by comparing the text with the writings of known authors? Can we determine if a text, or parts of it, has been plagiarized? Such questions are clearly of both academic and commercial importance.

The task of determining or verifying the authorship of an anonymous text based solely on internal evidence is a very old one, dating back at least to the medieval scholastics, for whom the reliable attribution of a given text to a known ancient authority was essential to determining the text’s veracity. More recently, the problem of authorship attribution has gained greater prominence due to new applications in forensic analysis, humanities scholarship, and electronic commerce, and the development of...

Keywords

Verification Problem Plagiarism Detection Information Retrieval Method Multivariate Discriminant Analysis Statistical Machine Learn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The editors gratefully thank Benno Stein, co-organizer of the PAN workshops, for his invaluable assistance throughout the editing process. Many thanks to Paolo Rosso (co-organizer of PAN-09, and PAN-10), Martin Potthast and Alberto Barron-Cedeno (co-organizers of the competition on plagiarism detection held in conjunction with PAN-09 and PAN-10).

References

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  8. Stein, B., Rosso, P., Stamatatos, E., & Koppel, M. (Eds.). (2010). CLEF 2010 Workshop on uncovering plagiarism, authorship, and social software misuse (PAN-10).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Information and Communication Systems EngineeringUniversity of the AegeanKarlovassiGreece
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael

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