Language Resources and Evaluation

, Volume 44, Issue 1–2, pp 115–135

The variability of multi-word verbal expressions in Estonian

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Abstract

This article focuses on the variability of one of the subtypes of multi-word expressions, namely those consisting of a verb and a particle or a verb and its complement(s). We build on evidence from Estonian, an agglutinative language with free word order, analysing the behaviour of verbal multi-word expressions (opaque and transparent idioms, support verb constructions and particle verbs). Using this data we analyse such phenomena as the order of the components of a multi-word expression, lexical substitution and morphosyntactic flexibility.

Keywords

Estonian language Idioms Multi-word expressions Particle verbs Support verb constructions 

Abbreviations

ADE

Adessive case

ALL

Allative case

COND

Conditional

GEN

Genitive case

ELA

Elative case

ILL

Illative case

IPS

Impersonal

NOM

Nominative case

PART

Partitive case

PL

Plural

PST

Past

PTCP

Participle

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Estonian and General LinguisticsUniversity of TartuTartuEstonia

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