Chromosome Research

, Volume 16, Issue 8, pp 1075–1084 | Cite as

Separation and maintenance of normal cells from human embryonic stem cells with trisomy 12 mosaicism

  • Hye Won Seol
  • Sun Kyung Oh
  • Yong Bin Park
  • Hee Sun Kim
  • Jin Ah Baek
  • Jin Seo
  • Eun Hee Kim
  • Seung Yup Ku
  • Seok Hyun Kim
  • Young Min Choi
  • Shin Yong Moon
Article

Abstract

Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent and hold great promise as useful tools in basic scientific research and in the field of regenerative medicine. However, several studies have recently reported chromosomal abnormalities such as gains of chromosomes 12, 17 and X in hESCs. This genetic instability presents an obstacle in the application of hESCs as sources of cell therapies. We found that trisomy 12 was correlated with changes in hESC colony morphology during hESC maintenance. In this study, we investigated whether normal and trisomy 12 cells could be separated in hESC cultures displaying trisomy 12 mosaicism with two types of colony morphology using a mechanical transfer technique. Eight sublines were cultured from eight hESC colonies displaying normal or abnormal morphology. Four sublines with normal morphology had normal chromosome 12 numbers, whereas the four sublines with abnormal morphology displayed trisomy 12. These results indicate that a hESC colony with a minor degree of chromosomal mosaicism and normal morphology could proceed to a colony with normal chromosomes after prolonged cultures with mechanical transfer. Therefore, analysis of cultures for chromosomal abnormalities when changes in colony morphology are observed during culture is essential for maintaining normal hESC lines.

Keywords

chromosomal abnormality colony morphology human embryonic stem cell trisomy 12 

Abbreviations

AP

alkaline phosphatase

EC

embryonic carcinoma

FISH

fluorescence in-situ hybridization

hESC

human embryonic stem cell

IVF

in-vitro fertilization

SCID

severe combined immunodeficiency

SNUhES4

Seoul National University human Embryonic Stem cell line 4

SSEA-4

stage specific embryonic antigen-4

TGCT

testicular germ cell tumour

Tra-1-60

tumour rejection antigen-1-60

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hye Won Seol
    • 1
  • Sun Kyung Oh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yong Bin Park
    • 3
  • Hee Sun Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jin Ah Baek
    • 1
  • Jin Seo
    • 1
  • Eun Hee Kim
    • 1
  • Seung Yup Ku
    • 1
    • 2
  • Seok Hyun Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Young Min Choi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shin Yong Moon
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Reproductive Medicine and Population, Medical Research CenterSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  3. 3.Central Research InstituteSam Jin Pharm. Co. Ltd.HwasungKorea

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