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Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 403–411 | Cite as

Peripheral Nerve Lesion Induces an Up-regulation of Spy1 in Rat Spinal Cord

  • Ye Huang
  • Yonghua Liu
  • Ying Chen
  • Xiaowei Yu
  • Junling Yang
  • Mudan Lu
  • Qiuyan Lu
  • Qing Ke
  • Aiguo Shen
  • Meijuan YanEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Spy1, as a member of the Speedy/RINGO family and a novel activator of cyclin-dependent kinases, was shown to promote cell cycle progression and cell survival in response to DNA damage. While its expression and roles in nervous system lesion and repair were still unknown. Here, we performed an acute sciatic nerve injury model in adult rats and studied the dynamic changes of Spy1 expression in lumbar spinal cord. Temporally, Spy1 expression was increased shortly after sciatic nerve crush and peaked at day 2. Spatially, Spy1 was widely expressed in the lumbar spinal cord including neurons and glial cells. While after injury, Spy1 expression was increased predominantly in astrocytes and microglia, which were largely proliferated. Moreover, there was a concomitant up-regulation of CDK2 activity and down-regulation of p27. Collectively, we hypothesized peripheral nerve injury induced an up-regulation of Spy1 in lumbar spinal cord, which was associated with glial proliferation.

Keywords

Glial cells Proliferation Sciatic nerve injury Spinal cord Spy1 

Abbreviations

CNS

Central nervous system

CDKs

Cyclin-dependent kinases

CDKIs

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

CDK2

Cyclin-dependent kinase 2

PAGE

Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

ECL

Enhanced chemiluminescence system

BSA

Bovine serum albumin

DAB

Diaminobenzidin

NeuN

Neuronal nuclei

GFAP

Glial fibrillary acidic protein

PCNA

Proliferating cell nuclear antigen

RT-PCR

Reverse transcriptase PCR

GAPDH

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Natural Scientific Foundation of China Grant (No.30300099 and No.30770488), Natural Scientific Foundation of Jiangsu Province Grant (No.BK2003035 and No.BK2006547), College and University Natural Scientific Research Programme of Jiangsu Province (No.03KJB180109 and No. 04KJB320114), Technology Guidance Plan for Social Development of Jiangsu Province Grant (BS2004526), Health Project of Jiangsu Province (H200632), and “Liu-Da-Ren-Cai-Gao-Feng” Financial Assistance of Jiangsu Province Grant (No.2), Postgraduate Scientific Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province (No. CX08S_026Z).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ye Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yonghua Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ying Chen
    • 4
  • Xiaowei Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Junling Yang
    • 3
  • Mudan Lu
    • 3
  • Qiuyan Lu
    • 3
  • Qing Ke
    • 3
  • Aiguo Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Meijuan Yan
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Orthopaedics of the Second Affiliated HospitalNanjing Medical UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of NeuroregenerationNantong UniversityNantongChina
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical CollegeNantong UniversityNantongChina
  4. 4.Department of Histology and Embryology, Medical CollegeNantong UniversityNantongChina

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