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Cellulose

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All-cellulose composites based on jute cellulose nanowhiskers and electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) fibrous membranes

  • Xinwang CaoEmail author
  • Mengting Zhu
  • Fangwei Fan
  • Yinzhi Yang
  • Qiang Zhang
  • Yiren Chen
  • Xin Wang
  • Zhongmin DengEmail author
Original Research
  • 44 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, all-cellulose nanocomposites were developed by depositing one-dimensional jute cellulose nanowhiskers on a hydrolyzed two dimensional electrospun nanofibrous membrane via an immersion-drying process. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared, field emission scanning electron microscope, thermal gravimetric analysis, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller specific surface area, and mechanical properties. The versatile all-cellulose nanocomposites have the potential to be used in ultrafiltration, medical application, catalyst supports, etc.

Keywords

Cellulose nanowhiskers Electrospun CA fibrous membrane Hydrolysis All-cellulose nanocomposites 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51503162), the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province (Grant No. 2016CFB459) and Hubei province technical innovation special Project (No. 2019AAA005).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinwang Cao
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Mengting Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fangwei Fan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yinzhi Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qiang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yiren Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Wang
    • 3
  • Zhongmin Deng
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Textiles Science and EngineeringWuhan Textile UniversityWuhanChina
  2. 2.National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean ProductionWuhan Textile UniversityWuhanChina
  3. 3.School of Fashion and TextilesRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of New Textile Materials and Advanced Processing TechnologiesWuhan Textile UniversityWuhanChina

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