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Cellulose

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Preparation of thermally stable and surface-functionalized cellulose nanocrystals by a fully recyclable organic acid and ionic liquid mediated technique under mild conditions

  • Xiaotong Fu
  • Hairui Ji
  • Binshou Wang
  • Wenyuan Zhu
  • Zhiqiang Pang
  • Cuihua DongEmail author
Original Research
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

Here we report the preparation of thermally stable and surface-functionalized cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by a fully recyclable organic acid and ionic liquid (IL) mediated technique under mild conditions. The microcrystal cellulose (MCC) was firstly pretreated via a controlled partial swelling by IL to improve its accessibility. Subsequent hydrolysis of cellulose chains of MCC in amorphous regions by an organic acid (oxalic acid) under below 100 °C produced the surface-functionalized CNCs. The obtained CNCs exhibited excellent properties, such as a superb thermal stability (Tonset = 324 °C), a high crystallinity index (81.36%), a high surface charges loading (ζ =− 32 mV), and a uniform size distribution (average lengths of 202 nm). Therefore, the current study has a practical significance for the green and sustainable preparation of high-performance CNCs.

Graphic abstract

Keywords

Cellulose nanocrystals Surface-functionalization High thermal stability Fully recyclable organic acid Ionic liquid 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful for the support of Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (No. ZR2017MC007), the International Cooperation Funding of Qilu University of Technology (QLUTGJHZ2018030; QLUTGJHZ2018027). Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory and Paper Science and Technology (KL201906, KL201905), the Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program (KT2018BAC032).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaotong Fu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hairui Ji
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Binshou Wang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Wenyuan Zhu
    • 2
  • Zhiqiang Pang
    • 1
  • Cuihua Dong
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Biobased Material and Green PapermakingQilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences)JinanChina
  2. 2.Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and TechnologyNanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingChina
  3. 3.School of Light Industry Science and EngineeringQilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences)JinanChina

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