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A heterogeneous binary solvent system for recyclable reactive dyeing of cotton fabrics

  • Jiangbin Zhao
  • Aphra Agaba
  • Xiaofeng Sui
  • Zhiping Mao
  • Hong Xu
  • Yi Zhong
  • Linping Zhang
  • Bijia Wang
Original Paper

Abstract

Recyclable reactive dyeing of cotton fabrics was achieved in a heterogeneous non-aqueous binary solvent system. Ethyl octanoate (EO) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were selected as exhaustion medium and solvating medium respectively. The solvents were immiscible at room temperature but formed a continuous phase upon heating and agitation, allowing for simple separation after dyeing. Sufficient swelling of the cotton fabric and excellent dye substantivity could be achieved by tuning ratio of the DMSO and EO. Compared with conventional aqueous dyeing, the solvent-based process required up to 40% less amount of dye and no inorganic salts. The dyeing sequence could be repeated 10 times. At the end of each dyeing cycle, 98.5 v% each of EO and DMSO was recovered and reused. The process was generally applicable to commercial monochlorotriazine dyes with consistently good shade build-up and colorfastness. Therefore, the heterogeneous DMSO/EO dyeing system provides a promising solution to the environmental problems associated with reactive dyeing of cotton in a source-controlled manner.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Non-aqueous dyeing Recyclable Reactive dyeing Cotton fabrics Salt-free 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was financially supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. 2232018A3-04, 2232018-02 and 2232018G-043), the National Key R&D Program of China (No. 2016YFC0802802), and the Programmer of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities (No. 105-07-005735).

Supplementary material

10570_2018_2069_MOESM1_ESM.docx (2.4 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 2419 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiangbin Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aphra Agaba
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaofeng Sui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Zhiping Mao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hong Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yi Zhong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Linping Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bijia Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Key Lab of Science and Technology of Eco-Textile, Ministry of EducationDonghua UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and BiotechnologyDonghua UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Key Lab of High Performance Fibers and Products, Ministry of EducationDonghua UniversityShanghaiChina

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