Cellulose

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 1581–1589 | Cite as

Determination of nanocellulose fibril length by shear viscosity measurement

  • Reina Tanaka
  • Tsuguyuki Saito
  • Daisuke Ishii
  • Akira Isogai
Original Paper

Abstract

The lengths of ten types of cellulose nanofibrils were evaluated by shear viscosity measurement of their dilute dispersions. Aqueous dispersions of surface-carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils with a uniform width of ~3 nm were prepared from wood cellulose by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-mediated oxidation and successive mechanical treatment. Cellulose nanofibril samples with different average lengths were prepared by controlling the conditions of the oxidation or mechanical treatment. The viscosity-average lengths, Lvisc, of the nanofibrils were calculated by applying the shear viscosities of the dilute dispersions to an equation for the dilute region flow behavior of rod-like polymer molecules. The obtained Lvisc values ranged from 1,100 to 2,500 nm and showed a linear relationship to the length-weighted average length, Lw, measured by microscopic observation; the relation was described as Lvisc = 1.764 × Lw + 764. The influences of the electric double-layer of the nanofibrils and surface-carboxylate content on the value of Lvisc were also investigated.

Keywords

Cellulose nanofibril Electric double-layer Length determination Shear viscosity TEMPO 

Supplementary material

10570_2014_196_MOESM1_ESM.doc (238 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 238 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reina Tanaka
    • 1
  • Tsuguyuki Saito
    • 1
  • Daisuke Ishii
    • 1
  • Akira Isogai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomaterials Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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