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Cellulose

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 1175–1181 | Cite as

Cellulose dissolution in aqueous lithium bromide solutions

  • Yeo-Jeong Yang
  • Ji-Min Shin
  • Tong Ho Kang
  • Satoshi Kimura
  • Masahisa Wada
  • Ung-Jin Kim
Original Paper

Abstract

A new all-aqueous process of the dissolution/regeneration of cellulose was developed. Cellulose was completely dissolved in the 54–60 wt% lithium bromide aqueous solutions in the temperature range of 110–130 °C within a dissolution time of 1 h. Then, the cellulose was directly regenerated from the solution by cooling down to approximately 70 °C and removing the salts with water, yielding a translucent gel. The cellulose gel was not significantly chemically decomposed even though some decrease of the degree of polymerization occurred during the dissolution/regeneration of cellulose. The X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the dissolution/regeneration of cellulose induced a crystalline structural change from cellulose I to cellulose II, confirming the complete loss of the original cellulose structure. The cellulose gel had highly porous three-dimensional networks composed of fairly long cellulose fibrils interconnected with one another. The dissolution/regeneration of cellulose in aqueous lithium bromide solutions offers new and important options for cellulose-based materials.

Keywords

Cellulose Cellulose solvent Lithium bromide Hydrogel 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A1A2042532) and a grant from the Kyung Hee University in 2011 (KHU-20110470). Also, this study was carried out with the support of Forest Science & Technology Projets (Project No. S211313L010110) provided by Korea Forest Service.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeo-Jeong Yang
    • 1
  • Ji-Min Shin
    • 1
  • Tong Ho Kang
    • 2
  • Satoshi Kimura
    • 1
    • 3
  • Masahisa Wada
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ung-Jin Kim
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Plant and Environmental New Resources, College of Life SciencesKyung Hee UniversityYongin-siRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Oriental Medical Materials and Processing, College of Life SciencesKyung Hee UniversityYongin-siRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Biomaterials Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Bioenergy Research Center, College of Life SciencesKyung Hee UniversityYongin-siRepublic of Korea

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