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Cellulose

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 75–80 | Cite as

Swelling and dissolution of cellulose, Part V: cellulose derivatives fibres in aqueous systems and ionic liquids

  • Céline Cuissinat
  • Patrick NavardEmail author
  • Thomas Heinze
Article

Abstract

The swelling and dissolution mechanisms of several cellulose derivatives (nitrocellulose, cyanoethylcellulose and xanthate fibres) are studied in aqueous systems (N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide—water with various contents of water, hydroxide sodium—water) and in ionic liquids. The results are compared with the five modes describing the swelling and dissolution mechanisms of cotton and wood cellulose fibres. The mechanisms observed for the cellulose derivatives are similar to the ones of cotton and wood fibres. Swelling by ballooning is also seen with cellulose derivatives, showing that this phenomenon is linked to the fibre morphology, which can be kept after undergoing a heterogeneous derivatisation.

Keywords

Cyanoethylcellulose Cellulose Dissolution Ionic liquids Nitrocellulose N-methylmorpholine N-oxide Swelling Xanthate 

Abbreviations

NMMO

N-methylmorpholine N-oxide

NaOH

Sodium hydroxide

DMSO

Dimethyl sulfoxide

([C4mim] + Cl−)

1-N-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

([Amim] + Br−)

Allylmethylimidazolium bromide

([Bmim] + Br−)

Butenylmethylimidazolium bromide

EPNOE

European Polysaccharide Network of Excellence

Notes

Ackowledgements

The authors would like to thank Wolff Cellulosics (J. Engelhardt) and Innovia Films (J. Marshall and M. Cockroft) for their help.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Céline Cuissinat
    • 1
  • Patrick Navard
    • 1
    Email author
  • Thomas Heinze
    • 2
  1. 1.Ecole des Mines de Paris – Centre de Mise en Forme des Matériaux (CEMEF)Unité Mixte de Recherche Ecole des Mines de Paris/CNRS n. 7635Sophia AntipolisFrance
  2. 2.Centre of Excellence for Polysaccharide ResearchFriedrich Schiller University of JenaJenaGermany

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