Multisystemic Therapy for Child Non-Externalizing Psychological and Health Problems: A Preliminary Review

  • Heather T. Pane
  • Rachel S. White
  • Michael R. Nadorff
  • Amie Grills-Taquechel
  • Melinda A. Stanley
Article

Abstract

Multisystemic therapy (MST) is effective for decreasing or preventing delinquency and other externalizing behaviors and increasing prosocial or adaptive behaviors. The purpose of this project was to review the literature examining the efficacy of MST for other child psychological and health problems reflecting non-externalizing behaviors, specifically difficulties related to child maltreatment, serious psychiatric illness [Serious psychiatric illness was defined throughout the current review paper as the “presence of symptoms of suicidal ideation, homicidal ideation, psychosis, or threat of harm to self or others due to mental illness severe enough to warrant psychiatric hospitalization based on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (Level of care placement criteria for psychiatric illness. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Washington, DC, 1996) level of care placement criteria for psychiatric illness” (Henggeler et al. in J Am Acad Child Psy 38:1331–1345, p. 1332, 1999b). Additionally, youth with “serious emotional disturbance (SED)” defined as internalizing and/or externalizing problems severe enough to qualify for mental health services in public school who were “currently in or at imminent risk of a costly out-of-home placement” (Rowland et al. in J Emot Behav Disord 13:13–23, pp. 13–14, 2005) were also included in the serious psychiatric illness category.], and health problems (i.e., obesity and treatment adherence for diabetes). PubMed, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases; Clinicaltrials.gov; DARE; Web of Knowledge; and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched; and MST developers were queried to ensure identification of all relevant articles. Of 242 studies identified, 18 met inclusion criteria for review. These were combined in a narrative synthesis and critiqued in the context of review questions. Study quality ratings were all above mean scores reported in prior reviews. Mixed support was found for the efficacy of MST versus other treatments. In many cases, treatment effects for MST or comparison groups were not sustained over time. MST was efficacious for youth with diverse backgrounds. No studies discussed efficacy of MST provided in different treatment settings. Four studies found MST more cost-effective than a comparison treatment, leading to fewer out-of-home placements for youth with serious psychiatric illness or lower treatment costs for youth with poorly controlled diabetes.

Keywords

Multisystemic Treatment Internalizing Maltreatment Health problems 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partly supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, and the Houston VA Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence (HFP90-020). The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the United States government or Baylor College of Medicine.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heather T. Pane
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rachel S. White
    • 1
    • 3
  • Michael R. Nadorff
    • 1
    • 4
  • Amie Grills-Taquechel
    • 5
  • Melinda A. Stanley
    • 6
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  2. 2.DePelchin Children’s CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics, Adolescent MedicineBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyMississippi State UniversityStarkvilleUSA
  5. 5.Boston University, School of Education, Two Silber WayBostonUSA
  6. 6.Houston VA HSR&D Center of Excellence (152)Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center (MEDVAMC)HoustonUSA
  7. 7.VA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical CenterHoustonUSA

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