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Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 348–365 | Cite as

Pediatric Feeding Disorders: A Quantitative Synthesis of Treatment Outcomes

  • William G. SharpEmail author
  • David L. Jaquess
  • Jane F. Morton
  • Caitlin V. Herzinger
Article

Abstract

A systematic review of the literature regarding treatment of pediatric feeding disorders was conducted. Articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals (1970–2010) evaluating treatment of severe food refusal or selectivity were identified. Studies demonstrating strict experimental control were selected and analyzed. Forty-eight single-case research studies reporting outcomes for 96 participants were included in the review. Most children presented with complex medical and developmental concerns and were treated at multidisciplinary feeding disorders programs. All studies involved behavioral intervention; no well-controlled studies evaluating feeding interventions by other theoretical perspectives or clinical disciplines met inclusion criteria. Results indicated that behavioral intervention was associated with significant improvements in feeding behavior. Clinical and research implications are discussed, including movement toward the identification of key behavioral antecedents and consequences that promote appropriate mealtime performance, as well as the need to better document outcomes beyond behavioral improvements, such as changes in anthropometric parameters, generalization of treatment gains to caregivers, and improvements in nutritional status.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Behavioral intervention Evidence-based treatment Failure to thrive Feeding Feeding disorders Mealtime problems 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • William G. Sharp
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • David L. Jaquess
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jane F. Morton
    • 1
    • 2
  • Caitlin V. Herzinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Marcus Autism CenterAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Emory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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