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Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 91–128 | Cite as

Peer Experiences of Anxious and Socially Withdrawn Youth: An Integrative Review of the Developmental and Clinical Literature

  • Julie Newman Kingery
  • Cynthia A. Erdley
  • Katherine C. Marshall
  • Kyle G. Whitaker
  • Tyson R. Reuter
Article

Abstract

Prior research indicates that both anxious youth and socially withdrawn youth tend to experience challenges and difficulties in various aspects of their peer relationships and social functioning. While clinical psychology researchers have examined how anxiety relates to peer experiences using normative and clinically anxious samples, developmental psychologists have focused primarily on the peer experiences of shy and withdrawn children. Research from these two fields has progressed on related yet separate paths, producing similar results despite using different terminology and assessment techniques. The purpose of this review is to bring together the developmental and clinical bodies of literature on the peer experiences of anxious and socially withdrawn youth by identifying common themes and unique contributions of each discipline. Studies reviewed focus specifically on the peer constructs of acceptance, friendship, peer victimization, social skills, and social-cognitive processes. Limitations including methodological inconsistencies and insufficient examination of age-, gender-, and ethnicity-related issues are identified. Recommendations for future collaborations between developmental and clinical researchers as well as implications for interventions targeting the peer relations of anxious and withdrawn youth are discussed.

Keywords

Anxiety Social withdrawal Peer acceptance Friendship Social skills 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Newman Kingery
    • 1
  • Cynthia A. Erdley
    • 2
  • Katherine C. Marshall
    • 1
  • Kyle G. Whitaker
    • 1
  • Tyson R. Reuter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHobart and William Smith CollegesGenevaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MaineOronoUSA

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