Development of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention Program to Treat Anxiety and Social Deficits in Teens with High-Functioning Autism

  • Susan W. White
  • Anne Marie Albano
  • Cynthia R. Johnson
  • Connie Kasari
  • Thomas Ollendick
  • Ami Klin
  • Donald Oswald
  • Lawrence Scahill
Article

Abstract

Anxiety is a common co-occurring problem among young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Characterized by deficits in social interaction, communication problems, and stereotyped behavior and restricted interests, this group of disorders is more prevalent than previously realized. When present, anxiety may compound the social deficits of young people with ASD. Given the additional disability and common co-occurrence of anxiety in ASD, we developed a manual-based cognitive-behavioral treatment program to target anxiety symptoms as well as social skill deficits in adolescents with ASD [Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention: MASSI]. In this paper, we describe the foundation, content, and development of MASSI. We also summarize data on treatment feasibility based on a pilot study that implemented the intervention.

Keywords

Autism Anxiety Social skills Adolescence Intervention Therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan W. White
    • 1
  • Anne Marie Albano
    • 2
  • Cynthia R. Johnson
    • 3
  • Connie Kasari
    • 4
  • Thomas Ollendick
    • 1
  • Ami Klin
    • 5
  • Donald Oswald
    • 6
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryColumbia University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics and PsychiatryChildren’s Hospital of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Psychological Studies in Education UCLA68-268 Semel Institute and Center for Autism Research and Treatment UCLALos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Yale School of MedicineYale Child Study CenterNew HavenUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  7. 7.Yale School of Nursing and Child Study CenterYale Child Study CenterNew HavenUSA

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