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Child and Youth Care Forum

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 11–24 | Cite as

Siege and Response: Reception and Benefits of Residential Children’s Mental Health Services for Parents and Siblings

  • Catherine de Boer
  • Gary CameronEmail author
  • Karen Frensch
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a qualitative study with 29 parents of children who have been in residential mental health care. It examines three main patterns identified by parents: (a) the importance of respite, (b) feeling welcomed and understood, and (c) improved personal and family functioning. It argues that benefits for parents and siblings of placed children deserve equal valuation with the needs of children in residential care and that the processes of achieving such gains are independent considerations from creating systems of care for troubled children or engaging family members in treatment plans for these children.

Keywords

Residential care Child and youth care, residential care and families Residential treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine de Boer
    • 1
  • Gary Cameron
    • 1
    Email author
  • Karen Frensch
    • 1
  1. 1.Lyle S. Hallman Chair in Child and Family Welfare, Faculty of Social WorkWilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada

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