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Rethinking the History of Ontario Day Nurseries: Loci for Intervention, Regulation and Administration

Part One
  • Veronica Pacini-KetchabawEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article is the first half of a manuscript to appear in Child and Youth Care Forum. The intent of the two-part article is to emphasize the discursive environment in which day nurseries in Ontario, Canada, developed in the early part of the twentieth century. This first half explores the theoretical lenses and the methodological approaches used for interpretation. Namely, the article uses poststructural approaches to understanding power/knowledge as an alternative lens to interpreting services for young children and their families. In this first part, the article also situates child care discourses within the broader literature of the history of childhood, and begins to outline the discursive environment in which day nurseries were created by describing how discourses of health positioned day nurseries as sites for intervention in the lives of young children and their families. Part Two continues this dialogue by describing how day nurseries were positioned as sites of regulation and administration. In particular, it explores discourses of child welfare and child psychology and connects these back to health discussions outlined in part one. To end the discussion, the second half presents connections to contemporary deliberations of child care.

Keywords

history of childhood poststructural analysis child care young children 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Child & Youth CareUniversity of VictoriaSTN CSC, VictoriaCanada
  2. 2.School of Child & Youth CareUniversity of VictoriaSTN CSC, VictoriaCanada

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