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Catalysis Letters

, Volume 148, Issue 9, pp 2703–2708 | Cite as

Electrocatalytic H2 Evolution of Bis(3,5-di-methylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate Anchored Hexa-coordinated Co(II) Derivative

  • Kuheli Das
  • Belete B. Beyene
  • Amitabha Datta
  • Eugenio Garribba
  • Chen-Hsiung Hung
Article
  • 84 Downloads

Abstract

A mononuclear Co(II) derivative, (1) is afforded by employing a ‘scorpionate’ type precursor, bdtbpza [bdtbpza = bis(3,5-di-t-butylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate]. Single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the CoII ion exhibits an octahedral geometry possessing on a O6 coordination environment. Detailed EPR interpretation and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution study are reported. Electrochemical and catalytic study of 1 in DMSO with the presence of acetic acid as weak proton source shows an observed rate constant of 3.7 × 103 s−1 and hydrogen evolution Faradaic efficiency of 74.7%. The catalytic process requires two-electron reduction of the catalyst and formation of a cobalt(II)-hydride species as reactive intermediate.

Graphical Abstract

Keywords

Co(II) Crystal structure EPR Electrocatalytic H2 evolution 

Notes

Acknowledgements

AD and CHH would like to express their appreciation to the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan for financial assistance.

Supplementary material

10562_2018_2477_MOESM1_ESM.docx (1.2 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 1198 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of ChemistryAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryBahir Dar UniversityBahir DarEthiopia
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Chimica e FarmaciaUniversità di SassariSassariItaly

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