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Cell and Tissue Banking

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 277–285 | Cite as

Comparative analysis of molecular activity in dermal mesenchymal stem cells from different passages

  • Xinhua Li
  • Junqin Li
  • Xincheng Zhao
  • Qiang Wang
  • Xiaohong Yang
  • Yueai Cheng
  • Min Zhou
  • Gang Wang
  • Erle Dang
  • Xiaoli Yang
  • Ruixia Hou
  • Peng An
  • Guohua Yin
  • Kaiming ZhangEmail author
Article

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are used for tissue regeneration in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases. However, the optimal sources and culture requirements for these cells are still under investigation. Here, we compared mRNA expression in dermal MSCs (DMSCs) at passage (P) 3 and P5 to provide a reference for future studies related to DMSCs expansion. In normal DMSCs, the expression of three of eight genes associated with basic cellular activity were different at P5 compared to that at P3: PLCB4 and SYTL2 were upregulated by 4.30- and 6.42-fold, respectively (P < 0.05), whereas SATB2 was downregulated by 39.25-fold (P < 0.05). At the same time, genes associated with proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, and apoptosis were expressed at similar levels at P3 and P5 (P > 0.05). In contrast, in DMSCs isolated from psoriatic patients we observed differential expression of three inflammation-associated genes at P5 compared to P3; thus IL6, IL8, and CXCL6 mRNA levels were upregulated by 16.02-, 31.15-, and 15.04-fold, respectively. Our results indicate that normal and psoriatic DMSCs showed different expression patterns for genes related to inflammation and basic cell activity at P3 and P5, whereas those for genes linked to proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis were mostly similar.

Keywords

Culture Dermal mesenchymal stem cells mRNA expression Passage 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81371736, 81401360, and 81472888), Science Foundation of Shanxi Province (Grant No. 2014011046-4 to CN), and Shanxi Health Department (Grant No. 201202046). We would like to thank all the volunteers participated in this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinhua Li
    • 1
  • Junqin Li
    • 1
  • Xincheng Zhao
    • 1
  • Qiang Wang
    • 1
  • Xiaohong Yang
    • 1
  • Yueai Cheng
    • 1
  • Min Zhou
    • 1
  • Gang Wang
    • 2
  • Erle Dang
    • 2
  • Xiaoli Yang
    • 1
  • Ruixia Hou
    • 1
  • Peng An
    • 1
  • Guohua Yin
    • 1
  • Kaiming Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Shanxi Key Laboratory of Stem Cell for Immunological Dermatosis, Institute of DermatologyTaiyuan City Center HospitalTaiyuanChina
  2. 2.Hospital of Xijing DermatologyXijing HospitalXi’anChina

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