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Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 5–6, pp 533–555 | Cite as

Commentary on Langer and Martin’s (2004) “How Dresses Can Make You Mentally Ill: Examining Gender Identity Disorder in Children”

  • Kenneth J. Zucker
Article

Abstract

Langer and Martin’s (2004) essay on the diagnosis of Gender Identity Disorder in Children (GIDC) is the most recent addition to a literature of critics. Although many of Langer and Martin’s criticisms have been raised by others, elements of their essay are novel. In this commentary, I attempt to counter some of their criticisms with a more detailed explication of the theoretical, research, and clinical literature on GID in children.

Keywords

Gender identity disorder DSM Children Adolescents 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gender Identity Service, Child, Youth, and Family ProgrammeCentre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada

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