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Long-term follow-up of renal arteries after radio-frequency catheter-based denervation using optical coherence tomography and angiography

  • Tomasz Roleder
  • Mariusz Skowerski
  • Andrzej Wiecek
  • Marcin Adamczak
  • Beata Czerwienska
  • Wojciech Wanha
  • Tomasz Jadczyk
  • Lukasz Partyka
  • Grzegorz Smolka
  • Wacław Kuczmik
  • Andrzej Ochała
  • Dariusz Dudek
  • Michał Tendera
  • Zbigniew Gasior
  • Wojciech Wojakowski
Original Paper

Abstract

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging at the time of renal denervation (RDN) showed that procedure might cause spasm, intimal injury or thrombus formation. In the present study, we assessed the healing of renal arteries after RDN using OCT and renal angiography in long-term follow-up. OCT and renal angiography were performed in 12 patients (22 arteries) 18.41 ± 5.83 months after RNS. There were no adverse events or complications during the long-term follow-up. In ten patients (83 %), significant reductions of blood pressure was achieved without a change of the antihypertensive medications. We demonstrated the presence of 26 areas of focal intimal thickening identified by OCT in 10 (83 %) patients and in 14 (63 %) arteries. The mean area of focal intimal thickening was 0.054 ± 0.033 mm2. No vessel dissection, thrombus, intimal tear or acute vasospasm were observed during the OCT analysis. Also, the quantitative angiography analysis revealed a significant reduction of the minimal and proximal lumen diameters at follow-up as compared to measurements obtained before RDN. Renal arteries have a favorable “long-term” vessel healing response after RDN. Focal intimal thickening and a modest reduction of the minimal lumen diameter may be observed after RF denervation. Further studies are needed to determine whether intravascular imaging may be helpful in evaluating the vessel healing of RF RDN.

Keywords

Optical coherence tomography Renal denervation Vessel healing Intimal thickening 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by European Union structural funds (Innovative Economy Operational Program POIG.01.01.02-00-109/09-00) and statutory funds of Medical University of Silesia.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were following the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomasz Roleder
    • 1
  • Mariusz Skowerski
    • 1
  • Andrzej Wiecek
    • 2
  • Marcin Adamczak
    • 2
  • Beata Czerwienska
    • 2
  • Wojciech Wanha
    • 3
  • Tomasz Jadczyk
    • 3
  • Lukasz Partyka
    • 4
  • Grzegorz Smolka
    • 3
  • Wacław Kuczmik
    • 6
  • Andrzej Ochała
    • 3
  • Dariusz Dudek
    • 5
  • Michał Tendera
    • 3
  • Zbigniew Gasior
    • 1
  • Wojciech Wojakowski
    • 3
  1. 1.Chair and Department of CardiologyMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  2. 2.Department of Nephrology, Transplantology, and Internal DiseasesMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  3. 3.Third Department of CardiologyMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  4. 4.Krakow Cardiovascular Research InstituteKrakowPoland
  5. 5.Institute of CardiologyJagiellonian University Medical CollegeKrakowPoland
  6. 6.Division of Vascular SurgeryMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland

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