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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 187–193 | Cite as

The Be-Well Study: a prospective cohort study of lifestyle and genetic factors to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

  • Marilyn L. KwanEmail author
  • Lawrence H. Kushi
  • Kim N. Danforth
  • Janise M. Roh
  • Isaac J. Ergas
  • Valerie S. Lee
  • Kimberly L. Cannavale
  • Teresa N. Harrison
  • Richard Contreras
  • Ronald K. Loo
  • David S. Aaronson
  • Charles P. Quesenberry
  • David Tritchler
  • Nirupa R. Ghai
  • Virginia P. Quinn
  • Christine B. Ambrosone
  • Yuesheng Zhang
  • Li Tang
Original Paper

Abstract

Purpose

Bladder cancer is one of the top five cancers diagnosed in the U.S. with a high recurrence rate, and also one of the most expensive cancers to treat over the life-course. However, there are few observational, prospective studies of bladder cancer survivors.

Methods

The Bladder Cancer Epidemiology, Wellness, and Lifestyle Study (Be-Well Study) is a National Cancer Institute-funded, multi-center prospective cohort study of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) patients (Stage Ta, T1, Tis) enrolled from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) and Southern California (KPSC) health care systems, with genotyping and biomarker assays performed at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. The goal is to investigate diet and lifestyle factors in recurrence and progression of NMIBC, with genetic profiles considered, and to build a resource for future NMIBC studies.

Results

Recruitment began in February 2015. As of 30 June 2018, 1,281 patients completed the baseline interview (774 KPNC, 511 KPSC) with a recruitment rate of 54%, of whom 77% were male and 23% female, and 80% White, 6% Black, 8% Hispanic, 5% Asian, and 2% other race/ethnicity. Most patients were diagnosed with Ta (69%) or T1 (27%) tumors. Urine and blood specimens were collected from 67% and 73% of consented patients at baseline, respectively. To date, 599 and 261 patients have completed the 12- and 24-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively, with additional urine and saliva collection.

Conclusions

The Be-Well Study will be able to answer novel questions related to diet, other lifestyle, and genetic factors and their relationship to recurrence and progression among early-stage bladder cancer patients.

Keywords

Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer Urothelial carcinoma Lifestyle and genetic factors Recurrence Prospective cohort study 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank all Be-Well Study staff, and most importantly, the study participants. The Be-Well Study is supported by the National Cancer Institute (R01CA172855). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agency.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no potential conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn L. Kwan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lawrence H. Kushi
    • 1
  • Kim N. Danforth
    • 2
  • Janise M. Roh
    • 1
  • Isaac J. Ergas
    • 1
  • Valerie S. Lee
    • 1
  • Kimberly L. Cannavale
    • 2
  • Teresa N. Harrison
    • 2
  • Richard Contreras
    • 2
  • Ronald K. Loo
    • 3
  • David S. Aaronson
    • 4
  • Charles P. Quesenberry
    • 1
  • David Tritchler
    • 5
  • Nirupa R. Ghai
    • 6
  • Virginia P. Quinn
    • 2
  • Christine B. Ambrosone
    • 7
  • Yuesheng Zhang
    • 8
  • Li Tang
    • 7
  1. 1.Division of ResearchKaiser Permanente Northern CaliforniaOaklandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Research & EvaluationKaiser Permanente Southern CaliforniaPasadenaUSA
  3. 3.Department of UrologyKaiser Permanente Downey Medical CenterDowneyUSA
  4. 4.Department of UrologyKaiser Permanente Oakland Medical CenterOaklandUSA
  5. 5.Department of BiostatisticsThe State University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  6. 6.Department of Surgical Quality and OutcomesKaiser Foundation Health PlanPasadenaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Cancer Prevention and ControlRoswell Park Comprehensive Cancer CenterBuffaloUSA
  8. 8.Department of Pharmacology and TherapeuticsRoswell Park Comprehensive Cancer CenterBuffaloUSA

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