Advertisement

Springer Nature is making Coronavirus research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

The Nine Habits of successful comprehensive cancer control coalitions

  • 166 Accesses

Abstract

The nine habits of successful comprehensive cancer control coalitions (Nine Habits) is a guide that outlines the key elements of successful comprehensive cancer control (CCC) coalitions. The guide was developed under the auspices of the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership (CCCNP) and is based on evaluation including a literature review, qualitative and quantitative data collection from high-performing comprehensive cancer control coalitions. Comprehensive cancer control coalitions are made up of key stakeholders who come together to create a shared vision and shared plans to fight cancer, improve health outcomes, and reduce the burden from cancer. The CCCNP produced this guide to help coalitions maintain the health of their coalition efforts by providing tools to examine the key elements of successful coalitions, including leadership, membership, organizational structure, shared resources, and efforts in planning and communications. This paper provides information on how the guide was used by two states to rebuild their coalition and ultimately improve their efforts in improving health outcomes and reducing cancer burden. Lastly, the paper outlines future efforts to continue to support CCC coalitions in their work.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Chart 1
Chart 2

References

  1. 1.

    Hohman et al (2010) The CCC national partnership: an example of organizations collaborating on comprehensive cancer control. Cancer Causes Control 21:1979–1985

  2. 2.

    Nine habits of successful CCC coalitions: a guide for an effective and efficient coalition. https://www.cccnationalpartners.org/new-resource-9-habits-successful-comprehensive-cancer-control-coalitions

  3. 3.

    Southeastern Program Evaluation, Inc (2011) Comprehensive cancer control program evaluation; appendix 1. American Cancer Society, Southeastern Program Evaluation, Inc., October. Unpublished report

  4. 4.

    Southeastern Program Evaluation, Inc (2011) Comprehensive cancer control program evaluation. American Cancer Society, Southeastern Program Evaluation, Inc, October. Unpublished report

  5. 5.

    CCCNP 2012–2013 CCC technical assistance workshops evaluation summary, November 6, 2013. Unpublished report

  6. 6.

    Fields RP, Stamatakis KA, Duggan K, Brownson RC (2015) Importance of scientific resources among local public health practitioners. Am J Public Health 105(suppl 2):S288–S294

  7. 7.

    Jacob R, Allen P, Ahrendt L, Brownson R (2017) Learning about and using research evidence among public health practitioners. Am J Prev Med 52(3S3):S304–S308

  8. 8.

    Hohman K, Rochester P, Kean T et al (2010) The CCC national partnership: an example of organizations collaborating on comprehensive cancer control. Cancer Causes Control 21:1979. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9644-0%5D

  9. 9.

    Farrell MM, La Porta M, Gallagher A, Vinson C, Bernal SB (2014) Research to reality: moving evidence into practice through an online community of practice. Prev Chronic Dis 11:130272]

  10. 10.

    Interview with Sharon Sowers, Section Chief. Comprehensive Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Pennsylvania Department of Health and Bob Durkin, Interim Chair, Pennsylvania Cancer Coalition

  11. 11.

    Hohman K (2012) Coalition corner! 9 habits of successful comprehensive cancer control coalitions. https://researchtoreality.cancer.gov/discussions/coalition-corner-9-habits-successful-comprehensive-cancer-control-coalitions. Accessed 17 Oct 2016

  12. 12.

    Rochester P, Adams E, Porterfield D, Holden D, McAleer K, Steele B (2011) Cancer plan index: a measure for assessing the quality of cancer plans. J Public Health Manag Pract 17(6):E12–E17

  13. 13.

    Alberg A, Cartmell K, Sterba K, Bolick S, Daguise V, Hebert J (2013) Outcome evaluation of a state comprehensive cancer control plan: laying the foundation. J Public Health Manag Pract 19(4):300–307

  14. 14.

    Given L, Hohman K, Graaf L, Rochester P, Belle-Isle L (2010) From planning to implementation to outcomes: comprehensive cancer control implementation building blocks. Cancer Causes Control 21:1987–1994

  15. 15.

    Ory M, Sanner B, Vollmer Dahlke D, Melvin C (2015) Promoting public health through state cancer control plans: a review of capacity and sustainability. Front Public Health 3:1–11

Download references

Acknowledgments

This project was supported in part by the award P30CA047904 from the National Institutes of Health to UPMC Hillman Cancer Center.

Author information

Correspondence to Karin Hohman.

Additional information

Disclaimer

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Cancer Institute.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Hohman, K., Given, L., Farrell, M. et al. The Nine Habits of successful comprehensive cancer control coalitions. Cancer Causes Control 29, 1195–1203 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1116-y

Download citation

Keywords

  • Comprehensive cancer
  • Cancer coalition
  • Technical assistance
  • Habits
  • Guide
  • Function
  • Operations
  • Partnership