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Evolution of comprehensive cancer control plans and partnerships

  • Karin Hohman
  • Leslie Given
  • Lorrie Graaf
  • Julie Sergeant
  • Dilhara Muthukuda
  • Tina Devery
  • Katie Jones
  • Kelly Wells Sittig
Original Paper
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

This article explores how comprehensive cancer control plans and partnerships have evolved, over the past 20 years, to meet the ever-changing environment of cancer prevention and control. This evolution has resulted in plans that take a more focused approach in identifying cancer-related priorities and coalitions with structures that have been redesigned to better engage a more wide-ranging group of partners to help address the priorities. Presented in this paper are examples from three states that describe how recognizing the need for change has led to improved processes in updating a cancer plan; strengthened and more diverse partnerships; and coalition sustainment by leveraging and maximizing resources.

Keywords

Comprehensive Cancer Control Partnership Plan Hybrid Coalition Evolution CCC 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Strategic Health ConceptsArvadaUSA
  2. 2.Strategic Health ConceptsEarlysvilleUSA
  3. 3.National Association of Chronic Disease DirectorsAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Kansas Department of Health and EnvironmentTopekaUSA
  5. 5.Michigan Department of Health and Human ServicesLansingUSA
  6. 6.Holden Comprehensive Cancer CenterIowa CityUSA
  7. 7.Iowa Department of Public HealthDes MoinesUSA
  8. 8.Iowa Cancer ConsortiumCoralvilleUSA

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