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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 29, Issue 10, pp 901–905 | Cite as

Temporal reliability of serum soluble and endogenous secretory receptors for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE and esRAGE) in healthy women

  • Fen Wu
  • Yelena Afanasyeva
  • Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
  • Jinghua Zhang
  • Ann Marie Schmidt
  • Yu Chen
Brief report
  • 75 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) have been considered as biomarkers of several chronic diseases. However, the temporal reliability of their concentrations in the circulation is yet to be demonstrated. We evaluated whether a single measurement of serum sRAGE and esRAGE could serve as an estimate for usual serum levels in epidemiologic studies.

Methods

Serum sRAGE and esRAGE were measured using ELISAs in three yearly samples from 36 participants in the New York University Women’s Health Study. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate temporal reliability.

Results

The intra- and inter-batch coefficients of variation were 3.0% and 14.8% for sRAGE and 6.5% and 34.7% for esRAGE, and decreased to 0.4% and 2.1% for sRAGE and 1.0% and 6.3% for esRAGE after log2-transformation of the data. On the original scale, the ICCs of a single measurement of serum sRAGE and esRAGE were 0.89 (95% CI 0.82–0.94) and 0.87 (95% CI 0.79–0.93), respectively, and were similar using log2-transformed data.

Conclusion

Our results indicate that a single measurement of serum sRAGE and esRAGE is a sufficiently reliable measure of their usual levels that can be used in epidemiologic studies.

Keywords

sRAGE esRAGE Biomarker Reliability ELISA Epidemiology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (Grant Numbers UM1CA182934, P30 CA016087, and P30 ES000260).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of New York University School of Medicine.

Informed consent

Written informed consent was obtained from all the subjects at the time of enrolment.

Supplementary material

10552_2018_1066_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 22 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Population HealthNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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