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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 325–332 | Cite as

The impact of historical breastfeeding practices on the incidence of cancer in France in 2015

  • Kevin D. ShieldEmail author
  • Laure Dossus
  • Agnès Fournier
  • Claire Marant Micallef
  • Sabina Rinaldi
  • Agnès Rogel
  • Isabelle Heard
  • Sophie Pilleron
  • Freddie Bray
  • Isabelle Soerjomataram
Original paper

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to estimate the number of new breast cancer cases in France in 2015 attributable to breastfeeding for durations below recommendations (at least 6 months per child), and cases prevented through historical breastfeeding. As a secondary analysis, the corresponding numbers for ovarian cancer were estimated.

Methods

Historical breastfeeding data were obtained from population surveys. Duration of breastfeeding data were obtained from the French Épifane cohort study. Relative risks were obtained from meta-analyses, cohort, and case–control studies. Cancer incidence data were obtained from the French Network of Cancer Registries. A 10-year latency period was assumed.

Results

Among parous women 25 years of age and older, 14.1% breastfed for at least 6 months per child born before 2006. As a result, 1,712 new breast cancer cases (3.2% of all new breast cancer cases) were attributable to breastfeeding for < 6 months per child, while actual breastfeeding practices prevented 765 breast cancer cases. Furthermore, 411 new ovarian cancer cases (8.6% of all new ovarian cancer cases) may be attributable to breastfeeding for < 6 months per child, with breastfeeding preventing 163 ovarian cancer cases.

Conclusions

The historically low breastfeeding prevalence and duration in France led to numerous avoidable cancer cases.

Keywords

Cancer Breast Ovary Lactation Breastfeeding France 

Notes

Funding

This project is funded by the French National Cancer Institute (Institut National du Cancer) for a project entitled “Définition des priorités pour la prévention du cancer en France métropolitaine: la fraction de cancers attribuables aux modes de vie et aux facteurs environnementaux” (Grant Number #: 2015-002 to I.S.). The work reported in this paper was partly performed during the stay of A.F. as a Visiting Scientist at the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10552_2018_1015_MOESM1_ESM.docx (235 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 234 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin D. Shield
    • 1
    Email author
  • Laure Dossus
    • 2
  • Agnès Fournier
    • 3
    • 4
  • Claire Marant Micallef
    • 1
  • Sabina Rinaldi
    • 2
  • Agnès Rogel
    • 5
  • Isabelle Heard
    • 6
    • 7
  • Sophie Pilleron
    • 1
  • Freddie Bray
    • 1
  • Isabelle Soerjomataram
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Cancer SurveillanceInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyon CEDEX 08France
  2. 2.Biomarkers GroupInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  3. 3.CESP “Health across Generations”, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Univ Paris-SaclayVillejuifFrance
  4. 4.Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  5. 5.Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Département des Maladies Chroniques et TraumatismesSaint MauriceFrance
  6. 6.Prevention and Implementation GroupInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  7. 7.Hospital Tenon, AP-HPParisFrance

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