Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 527–543

Red meat, poultry, and fish intake and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic white women: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

  • Andre E. Kim
  • Abbie Lundgreen
  • Roger K. Wolff
  • Laura Fejerman
  • Esther M. John
  • Gabriela Torres-Mejía
  • Sue A. Ingles
  • Stephanie D. Boone
  • Avonne E. Connor
  • Lisa M. Hines
  • Kathy B. Baumgartner
  • Anna Giuliano
  • Amit D. Joshi
  • Martha L. Slattery
  • Mariana C. Stern
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-016-0727-4

Cite this article as:
Kim, A.E., Lundgreen, A., Wolff, R.K. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2016) 27: 527. doi:10.1007/s10552-016-0727-4

Abstract

Purpose

There is suggestive but limited evidence for a relationship between meat intake and breast cancer (BC) risk. Few studies included Hispanic women. We investigated the association between meats and fish intake and BC risk among Hispanic and NHW women.

Methods

The study included NHW (1,982 cases and 2,218 controls) and the US Hispanics (1,777 cases and 2,218 controls) from two population-based case–control studies. Analyses considered menopausal status and percent Native American ancestry. We estimated pooled ORs combining harmonized data from both studies, and study- and race-/ethnicity-specific ORs that were combined using fixed or random effects models, depending on heterogeneity levels.

Results

When comparing highest versus lowest tertile of intake, among NHW we observed an association between tuna intake and BC risk (pooled OR 1.25; 95 % CI 1.05–1.50; trend p = 0.006). Among Hispanics, we observed an association between BC risk and processed meat intake (pooled OR 1.42; 95 % CI 1.18–1.71; trend p < 0.001), and between white meat (OR 0.80; 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; trend p = 0.01) and BC risk, driven by poultry. All these findings were supported by meta-analysis using fixed or random effect models and were restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Processed meats and poultry were not associated with BC risk among NHW women; red meat and fish were not associated with BC risk in either race/ethnic groups.

Conclusions

Our results suggest the presence of ethnic differences in associations between meat and BC risk that may contribute to BC disparities.

Keywords

Breast cancer Meat Hispanics Processed meat 

Supplementary material

10552_2016_727_MOESM1_ESM.xlsx (14 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (XLSX 13 kb)
10552_2016_727_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLSX 15 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Cancer Institute
  • CA14002 f
  • CA63446
  • CA77305
  • CA078682
  • CA078762
  • CA078552
  • CA078802
  • P30CA014089
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs
  • DAMD17-96-1-6071
California Breast Cancer Research Program
  • 7PB-0068
national cancer institute
  • CA078682
  • CA078762
  • P30CA014089
Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología
  • SALUD-2002-C01-7462
American Cancer Society
  • RSF-09-020-01-CNE
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  • 5P30 ES07048
  • 5T32 ES013678

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andre E. Kim
    • 1
  • Abbie Lundgreen
    • 2
  • Roger K. Wolff
    • 2
  • Laura Fejerman
    • 3
  • Esther M. John
    • 4
    • 5
  • Gabriela Torres-Mejía
    • 6
  • Sue A. Ingles
    • 1
  • Stephanie D. Boone
    • 7
  • Avonne E. Connor
    • 8
  • Lisa M. Hines
    • 9
  • Kathy B. Baumgartner
    • 7
  • Anna Giuliano
    • 10
  • Amit D. Joshi
    • 11
  • Martha L. Slattery
    • 2
  • Mariana C. Stern
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Preventive Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine of USCUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Utah Health Sciences CenterSalt Lake CityUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Human Genetics and Department of MedicineUniversity of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Epidemiology, Cancer Prevention Institute of CaliforniaFremontUSA
  5. 5.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, and Stanford Cancer InstituteStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  6. 6.Instituto Nacional de Salud PúblicaCentro de Investigación en Salud PoblacionalCuernavaca MorelosMexico
  7. 7.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health and Information SciencesUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  8. 8.Departments of Epidemiology and OncologyJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer CenterBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Department of BiologyUniversity of Colorado at Colorado SpringsColorado SpringsUSA
  10. 10.Department of ImmunologyH. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research InstituteTampaUSA
  11. 11.Department of GastroenterologyMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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