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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 26, Issue 6, pp 953–954 | Cite as

Human papillomavirus vaccination is changing the epidemiology of high-grade cervical lesions in Australia

  • Julia M. L. Brotherton
  • A. Marion Saville
  • Cathryn L. May
  • Genevieve Chappell
  • Dorota M. Gertig
Letter to the editor

Dear Editor,

In 2011, we reported the world’s first observation of a decline in high-grade cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia/adenocarcinoma in situ (CIN) in a population following the implementation of a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program [1]. As measured using the population-based histopathology records held on the Victorian Cervical Cytology Registry, a dramatic decline was evident in very young women in Victoria, Australia, (aged <18 years) by the third year of Australia’s large-scale HPV vaccination program. Between 2007 and 2009, free vaccination was offered to women in the age range of 12–26 years using the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. One-quarter of Australia’s female population live in Victoria. Coverage achieved in the initial catch-up program was 83, 78, and 70 % for dose 1, 2, and 3 in 12- to 17-years-olds [2] and at least 55, 45, and 32 % in 18- to 26-year-old women (with some incomplete reporting of doses to the National HPV Vaccination Program...

Keywords

Unvaccinated Woman Level Registry Data Histopathology Record Recommend Screening Interval Victorian Cervical Cytology Registry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Brotherton JML, Fridman M, May C, Chappell G, Saville AM, Gertig DM (2011) Early effect of the HPV vaccination program on cervical abnormalities in Victoria, Australia: an ecological study. Lancet 377:2085–2092. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60551-5 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brotherton JML, Murray SL, Hall MA, Andrewartha LK, Banks CA, Meijer D, Pitcher HC, Scully MM, Molchanoff L (2013) Human papillomavirus vaccine coverage among female Australian adolescents: success of the school-based approach. Med J Aust 199:614–617. doi: 10.5694/mja13.10272 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Brotherton JML, Liu B, Donovan B, Kaldor JM, Saville M (2014) Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage in young Australian women is higher than previously estimated: independent estimates from a nationally representative mobile phone survey. Vaccine 32:592–597. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.11.075 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gertig DM, Brotherton JML, Budd AC, Drennan K, Chappell G, Saville AM (2013) Impact of a population–based HPV vaccination program on cervical abnormalities: a data linkage study. BMC Med 11:227. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-11-227 CrossRefPubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Australian Government (2014) Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) recommendations. Australian Government, Department of Health, National Cervical Screening Program http://www.cancerscreening.gov.au/internet/screening/publishing.nsf/Content/ncsp-renewal. Accessed 22 July 2014

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia M. L. Brotherton
    • 1
  • A. Marion Saville
    • 1
  • Cathryn L. May
    • 1
  • Genevieve Chappell
    • 1
  • Dorota M. Gertig
    • 1
  1. 1.Victorian Cytology Service RegistriesVictorian Cytology ServiceEast MelbourneAustralia

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