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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 257–268 | Cite as

Dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies

  • Xu Yao
  • Zhong TianEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Purpose

The findings from epidemiologic studies of dyslipidemia and colorectal cancer risk have been conflicting. We performed a dose–response meta-analysis of published prospective studies to assess the aforementioned association.

Methods

Relevant studies that reported the association between the components of dyslipidemia (serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and high-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and colorectal cancer risk were identified by searching PubMed until the end of May 2014. We pooled the relative risks (RRs) from individual studies using a random- and fixed-effects models and performed dose–response, heterogeneity, and publication bias analyses.

Results

Seventeen prospective studies, including 1,987,753 individuals with 10,876 colorectal cancer events, were included in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled RR for high versus low concentrations for triglyceride (n = 9 studies) was 1.18 (95 % CI 1.04–1.34; I 2 = 47.8 %), for total cholesterol (n = 10 studies) was 1.11 (95 % CI 1.01–1.21; I 2 = 46.7 %), for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 6 studies) was 0.84 (95 % CI 0.69–1.02; I 2 = 42.5 %), and for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (n = 3 studies) was 1.04 (95 % CI 0.60–1.81; I 2 = 82.7 %). In the dose–response analysis, the overall pooled RR was 1.01 (95 % CI 1.00–1.03; I 2 = 0 %) per 50 mg/dL of triglyceride and 1.01 (95 % CI 0.97–1.05; I 2 = 64.3 %) per 100 mg/dL of total cholesterol.

Conclusions

This meta-analysis of prospective studies suggests that dyslipidemia, especially high levels of serum triglyceride and total cholesterol, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol might associate with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Further studies are warranted to determine whether altering the concentrations of these metabolic variables may reduce colorectal cancer risk.

Keywords

Cancer prevention Colorectal neoplasms Dyslipidemia Epidemiology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

None of the grant supports this study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10552_2014_507_MOESM1_ESM.tif (2.5 mb)
Supplementary material 1 Supplementary Figure S1. Forest plots (random effect model) of meta-analysis on the relationship between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and colorectal cancer risk. Squares indicate study-specific relative risks (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight); horizontal lines indicate 95 % CIs; and diamond indicates the summary relative risk estimate with its 95 % CI. CC: colon cancer; CI: confidence interval; CRC: colorectal cancer; F: female; M: male; RC: rectal cancer; and RR: relative risk. (TIFF 2,577 kb)
10552_2014_507_MOESM2_ESM.tif (1.8 mb)
Supplementary material 2 Supplementary Figure S2. Forest plots (random effect model) of meta-analysis on the relationship between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and colorectal cancer risk. Squares indicate study-specific relative risks (size of the square reflects the study-specific statistical weight); horizontal lines indicate 95 % CIs; and diamond indicates the summary relative risk estimate with its 95 % CI. CC: colon cancer; CI: confidence interval; CRC: colorectal cancer; F: female; M: male; RC: rectal cancer; and RR: relative risk. (TIFF 1,823 kb)
10552_2014_507_MOESM3_ESM.docx (48 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 47 kb)
10552_2014_507_MOESM4_ESM.doc (68 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (DOC 68 kb)
10552_2014_507_MOESM5_ESM.docx (19 kb)
Supplementary material 5 (DOCX 19 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General SurgeryShengjing Hospital of China Medical UniversityShenyangPeople’s Republic of China

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