Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 25, Issue 9, pp 1241–1242 | Cite as

Erratum to: Exposure to household painting and floor treatments, and parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case–control study

  • Kathryn R. Greenop
  • Susan Peters
  • Lin Fritschi
  • Deborah C. Glass
  • Lesley J. Ashton
  • Helen D. Bailey
  • Rodney J. Scott
  • John Daubenton
  • Nicholas H. de Klerk
  • Bruce K. Armstrong
  • Elizabeth Milne
Erratum
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Erratum to: Cancer Causes Control (2014) 25:283–291 DOI 10.1007/s10552-013-0330-x

After publication, it was noted by the authors that the dataset used for the analyses of occupational exposures in this study accidentally used incomplete occupational histories for 94 control fathers and 104 control mothers recruited in 2006, and these control parents were all treated as unexposed to occupational painting.

Results in Tables 1–5 were unaffected by this error as they concerned household rather than occupational paint exposure. The conclusions regarding the association with household exposure to paint and floor treatments are consequently unaffected.

However, for occupational exposure, 15 control fathers and 1 control mother were mistakenly classified as being unexposed when they should have been classified as exposed (any time before the child’s birth). The analyses presented in Table 6 in the published article were rerun using the complete dataset to ensure correct exposure assignment (5 case fathers and 4 control fathers were additionally excluded from the revised occupational analysis due to genuinely missing data). The updated Table 6 is presented in this erratum.
Table 6

Fathers’ occupational exposure to the application of paint and risk of CBT

 

n cases/controls

ORa

95 % CI

No exposure before the child’s birth

187/642

1.00

Referent

Any exposure before the child’s birth

54/153

1.23

0.85, 1.78

Any exposure in the “conception year”b,c

18/52

1.26

0.70, 2.27

aORs adjusted for matching variables (child’s age, sex, state of residence), paternal education, year of diagnosis/recruitment, paternal occupational exposure to diesel exhausts in the 2 years prior to birth

b“Conception year” relates to the 2 years before the birth year

cReference level is no occupational painting before the child’s birth

In the original publication, the authors commented in the results section that the ORs for paternal occupational exposure to paints were slightly elevated but lacked precision, and in the conclusion remarked that there was "little evidence that exposure to paints at home, or parental exposure at work, was associated with risk of CBT." The revised ORs for paternal occupational exposure to paints are only slightly different from those previously published so these statements are still correct. There were still too few occupationally exposed mothers to analyse (2 cases/6 controls).

The sentence in the abstract concerning fathers’ occupational exposure should now read:

“The OR for the association between CBT and paternal occupational exposure to paint any time before the pregnancy was 1.23 (95 % CI 0.85, 1.78), which is consistent with the results of other studies.”

The authors offer their sincere apologies for any confusion that they may have caused.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn R. Greenop
    • 1
  • Susan Peters
    • 2
  • Lin Fritschi
    • 2
  • Deborah C. Glass
    • 3
  • Lesley J. Ashton
    • 4
  • Helen D. Bailey
    • 1
    • 5
  • Rodney J. Scott
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • John Daubenton
    • 9
  • Nicholas H. de Klerk
    • 1
  • Bruce K. Armstrong
    • 10
  • Elizabeth Milne
    • 1
  1. 1.Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health ResearchUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  2. 2.Western Australian Institute for Medical ResearchUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive MedicineMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.School of Women and Children’s HealthUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  5. 5.Section of Environment and RadiationInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  6. 6.School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of HealthUniversity of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  7. 7.Hunter Medical Research InstituteJohn Hunter HospitalNewcastleAustralia
  8. 8.Hunter Area Pathology ServiceHNEHealthNewcastleAustralia
  9. 9.Division of Women’s, Adolescent and Children’s Services (WACS)Royal Hobart HospitalHobartAustralia
  10. 10.Sydney School of Public HealthUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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