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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 639–646 | Cite as

Dietary intake of acrylamide and esophageal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort

  • Leila Lujan-Barroso
  • Carlos Alberto González
  • Nadia Slimani
  • Mireia Obón-Santacana
  • Pietro Ferrari
  • Heinz Freisling
  • Kim Overvad
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
  • Antoine Racine
  • Verena Katzke
  • Tilman Kühn
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • Anja Olsen
  • J. Ramón Quirós
  • Emilio Sánchez-Cantalejo
  • Pilar Amiano
  • Carmen Navarro
  • Aurelio Barricarte
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
  • Nick Wareham
  • Ruth C. Travis
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
  • Christina Bamia
  • Vassiliki Benetou
  • Calogero Saieva
  • Sara Grioni
  • Rosario Tumino
  • Paolo Vineis
  • Amalia Mattiello
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
  • Peter D. Siersema
  • Mattijs E. Numans
  • Petra H. Peeters
  • Ulrika Ericson
  • Elisabet Wirfält
  • Malin Sund
  • Mattias Johansson
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
  • Guri Skeie
  • Elio Riboli
  • Heiner Boeing
  • Eric J. DuellEmail author
Brief report

Abstract

Purpose

The relation between dietary acrylamide intake and esophageal cancer (EC) risk, including esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), has not been consistent. We evaluated the association between dietary acrylamide intake and EAC, ESCC, and overall EC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

Methods

Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the HR and 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI). Since nonlinear relations were observed, HRs were displayed for quartiles of acrylamide intake in μg per day.

Results

After a mean follow-up of 11 years, 341 EC were identified, 142 of which were EAC, 176 ESCC, and 23 other histological types or not specified. An increase in EC risk was observed in the second and third quartiles (HRQ2vsQ1 1.75, 95 % CI 1.12–2.74; HRQ3vsQ1 1.66, 95 % CI 1.05–2.61), but not in the fourth quartile, and there was no evidence for a linear dose–response trend. HRs were similarly elevated but not statistically significant when ESCC and EAC were analyzed separately, due to the small number of cases observed. No associations were observed when quartiles were based on energy-adjusted acrylamide intake.

Conclusions

In the EPIC cohort, an association between estimated dietary acrylamide intake and an increased risk of developing EC was observed in the middle quartiles but not in the highest quartile; however, results from other larger cohorts or consortia, and results from biomarker studies, might add to the evidence provided by this analysis, suggesting that acrylamide is not an important risk factor for EC.

Keywords

Esophageal cancer Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma Esophageal adenocarcinoma Acrylamide intake Cohort Nutrition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by Wereld Kanker Onderzoek Fonds (WCRF NL) (Grant WCRF 2011/442) and by the Health Research Fund (FIS) of the Spanish Ministry of Health (Exp PI11/01473). The coordination of EPIC is financially supported by the European Commission (DG-SANCO) and the IARC. The national cohorts are supported by the Health Research Fund (FIS) of the Spanish Ministry of Health (Exp P10710130), Regional Governments of Andalucía, Asturias, Basque Country, Murcia (No. 6236), Navarra, and the Catalan Institute of Oncology, La Caixa (BM 06-130), RTICC-RD06/10091 and RD12/0036/0018 (Spain); Danish Cancer Society (Denmark); Ligue contre le Cancer, Institut Gustave Roussy, Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) (France); Deutsche Krebshilfe, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum and Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Germany); the Hellenic Health Foundation (Greece); Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC) and National Research Council (Italy); Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS), Netherlands Cancer Registry (NKR), LK Research Funds, Dutch Prevention Funds, Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland), World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), and Statistics Netherlands (The Netherlands); Swedish Cancer Society, Swedish Scientific Council and Regional Government of Skåne and Västerbotten (Sweden); NordForsk (Centre of Excellence programme HELGA (070015)) (Norway); Cancer Research UK, Medical Research Council (UK).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Lujan-Barroso
    • 1
  • Carlos Alberto González
    • 1
  • Nadia Slimani
    • 2
  • Mireia Obón-Santacana
    • 1
  • Pietro Ferrari
    • 2
  • Heinz Freisling
    • 2
  • Kim Overvad
    • 3
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Antoine Racine
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Verena Katzke
    • 7
  • Tilman Kühn
    • 7
  • Anne Tjønneland
    • 8
  • Anja Olsen
    • 8
  • J. Ramón Quirós
    • 9
  • Emilio Sánchez-Cantalejo
    • 10
  • Pilar Amiano
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
  • Carmen Navarro
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15
  • Aurelio Barricarte
    • 16
    • 17
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
    • 18
  • Nick Wareham
    • 18
  • Ruth C. Travis
    • 19
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
    • 20
    • 21
  • Christina Bamia
    • 20
    • 21
  • Vassiliki Benetou
    • 20
    • 21
  • Calogero Saieva
    • 22
  • Sara Grioni
    • 23
  • Rosario Tumino
    • 24
  • Paolo Vineis
    • 25
    • 26
  • Amalia Mattiello
    • 27
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
    • 28
    • 29
  • Peter D. Siersema
    • 29
  • Mattijs E. Numans
    • 30
    • 31
  • Petra H. Peeters
    • 30
    • 32
  • Ulrika Ericson
    • 33
  • Elisabet Wirfält
    • 34
  • Malin Sund
    • 35
  • Mattias Johansson
    • 2
    • 36
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
    • 37
    • 38
    • 39
    • 40
  • Guri Skeie
    • 37
  • Elio Riboli
    • 25
  • Heiner Boeing
    • 41
  • Eric J. Duell
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO)Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL)L’Hospitalet de LlobregatSpain
  2. 2.International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)LyonFrance
  3. 3.Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public HealthAarhus UniversityAarhusDenmark
  4. 4.Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women’s Health team, Villejuif, FranceINSERMVillejuifFrance
  5. 5.Univesity Paris Sud, UMRS 1018VillejuifFrance
  6. 6.IGRVillejuifFrance
  7. 7.Division of Cancer EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  8. 8.Danish Cancer Society Research CenterCopenhagenDenmark
  9. 9.Public Health DirectorateAsturiasSpain
  10. 10.Andalusian School of Public HealthCIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP)GranadaSpain
  11. 11.Public Health Division of GipuzkoaSan SebastiánSpain
  12. 12.Health Department of Basque RegionBioDonostia Research InstituteSan SebastiánSpain
  13. 13.CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Pública (CIBERESP)MadridSpain
  14. 14.Department of EpidemiologyMurcia Regional Health CouncilMurciaSpain
  15. 15.Department of Health and Social SciencesUniversidad de MurciaMurciaSpain
  16. 16.Navarre Public Health InstitutePamplonaSpain
  17. 17.Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public HealthCIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP)MadridSpain
  18. 18.MRC Epidemiology UnitUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  19. 19.Cancer Epidemiology UnitUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  20. 20.Hellenic Health FoundationAthensGreece
  21. 21.WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical StatisticsUniversity of Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece
  22. 22.Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention InstituteISPOFlorenceItaly
  23. 23.Epidemiology and Prevention UnitFondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei TumoriMilanItaly
  24. 24.Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, “Civic - M.P.Arezzo” HospitalASP RagusaRagusaItaly
  25. 25.School of Public HealthImperial College LondonLondonUK
  26. 26.HuGeF FoundationTurinItaly
  27. 27.Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e ChirurgiaFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly
  28. 28.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)BilthovenThe Netherlands
  29. 29.Department of Gastroenterology and HepatologyUniversity Medical CentreUtrechtThe Netherlands
  30. 30.Department of Primary Care Julius CenterUMCUtrechtThe Netherlands
  31. 31.Department of General Practice and Elderly CareVUmc AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  32. 32.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsImperial College LondonLondonUK
  33. 33.Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease, Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Clinical SciencesLund UniversityMalmöSweden
  34. 34.Department of Clinical SciencesLund UniversityMalmöSweden
  35. 35.Department of SurgeryUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  36. 36.Department of Biobank ResearchUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  37. 37.Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of TromsøTromsöNorway
  38. 38.Department of ResearchCancer Registry of NorwayOsloNorway
  39. 39.Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  40. 40.Samfundet FolkhälsanHelsinkiFinland
  41. 41.Department of EpidemiologyGerman Institute of Human NutritionPotsdam-RehbrückeGermany

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