Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 795–803

Prevalence of type-specific human papillomavirus and pap results in Chinese women: a multi-center, population-based cross-sectional study

  • En-Qi Wu
  • Bin Liu
  • Jian-Feng Cui
  • Wen Chen
  • Jian-Bing Wang
  • Liang Lu
  • Mayineur Niyazi
  • Chao Zhao
  • Sheng-Da Ren
  • Chang-Qing Li
  • Xiang-Zhen Gong
  • Jennifer S. Smith
  • Jerome L. Belinson
  • Kai-Li Liaw
  • Christine Velicer
  • You-Lin Qiao
Original paper

Abstract

Purpose

To estimate the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among sexually active women in China.

Methods

We conducted a multi-center, population-based study between May 2006 and April 2007. A total of 4,215 women aged 17–54 years were surveyed from five geographical sites: Beijing, Shanghai, Shanxi, Henan, and Xinjiang. Direct endocervical exfoliated cells were collected from consenting participants for Sure Path liquid-based cytology (BD) and HPV testing. HPV testing was performed with Hybrid Capture II (Qiagen) with high-risk and low-risk probes, and Linear Array (Roche) was utilized for HPV genotyping.

Results

Approximately 11 % of the study population had a cytological abnormality (ASCUS or worse). HPV prevalence in the entire study population was 14.3 % (age-standardized to the world standard female population 14.5 %). The most prevalent types found were HPV16 (2.9 %), HPV52 (1.7 %), HPV58 (1.5 %), HPV33 (1 %), and HPV18 (0.8 %). Patterns of HPV prevalence differed by age, geographic region, and cytology findings. However, HPV16 was predominant among all grades of cytological abnormalities for all areas.

Conclusions

Although HPV18 appeared to be less frequent among population-based samples of China, given the high prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse pap abnormalities, prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines should substantially reduce the burden of cervical cancer in China.

Keywords

Human papillomavirus Cervical cancer Type-specific prevalence China Population-based study 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • En-Qi Wu
    • 1
  • Bin Liu
    • 1
  • Jian-Feng Cui
    • 1
  • Wen Chen
    • 1
  • Jian-Bing Wang
    • 1
  • Liang Lu
    • 1
  • Mayineur Niyazi
    • 2
  • Chao Zhao
    • 3
  • Sheng-Da Ren
    • 4
  • Chang-Qing Li
    • 5
  • Xiang-Zhen Gong
    • 6
  • Jennifer S. Smith
    • 7
  • Jerome L. Belinson
    • 8
  • Kai-Li Liaw
    • 9
  • Christine Velicer
    • 9
  • You-Lin Qiao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Cancer Institute and HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Gynecology, People’s Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous RegionXinjiang Medical UniversityUrumchiChina
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyPeking University People’s HospitalBeijingChina
  4. 4.Xiangyuan Women and Children HospitalBeijingChina
  5. 5.Xinmi Women and Children HospitalBeijingChina
  6. 6.Disease Control and Prevention Center in Hongkou DistrictShanghaiChina
  7. 7.Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public HealthUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  8. 8.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyThe Cleveland ClinicClevelandUSA
  9. 9.Merck Sharp and DohmeWhitehouse StationUSA

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