Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 463–468

Cohorts and consortia conference: a summary report (Banff, Canada, June 17–19, 2009)

  • Paolo Boffetta
  • Graham A. Colditz
  • John D. Potter
  • Laurence Kolonel
  • Paula J. Robson
  • Reza Malekzadeh
  • Daniela Seminara
  • Ellen L. Goode
  • Keun-Young Yoo
  • Paul Demers
  • Richard Gallagher
  • Ross Prentice
  • Yutaka Yasui
  • Kieran O’Doherty
  • Gloria M. Petersen
  • Cornelia M. Ulrich
  • Ilona Csizmadi
  • Ernest K. Amankwah
  • Nigel T. Brockton
  • Karen Kopciuk
  • S. Elizabeth McGregor
  • Linda E. Kelemen
Original paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-010-9717-0

Cite this article as:
Boffetta, P., Colditz, G.A., Potter, J.D. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2011) 22: 463. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9717-0

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have adapted to the genomics era by forming large international consortia to overcome issues of large data volume and small sample size. Whereas both cohort and well-conducted case–control studies can inform disease risk from genetic susceptibility, cohort studies offer the additional advantages of assessing lifestyle and environmental exposure–disease time sequences often over a life course. Consortium involvement poses several logistical and ethical issues to investigators, some of which are unique to cohort studies, including the challenge to harmonize prospectively collected lifestyle and environmental exposures validly across individual studies. An open forum to discuss the opportunities and challenges of large-scale cohorts and their consortia was held in June 2009 in Banff, Canada, and is summarized in this report.

Keywords

Biobanks Cohort studies Consortia Cancer Ethics Data harmonization Molecular epidemiology 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Boffetta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Graham A. Colditz
    • 3
  • John D. Potter
    • 4
  • Laurence Kolonel
    • 5
  • Paula J. Robson
    • 6
  • Reza Malekzadeh
    • 7
  • Daniela Seminara
    • 8
  • Ellen L. Goode
    • 9
  • Keun-Young Yoo
    • 10
  • Paul Demers
    • 11
  • Richard Gallagher
    • 12
  • Ross Prentice
    • 4
  • Yutaka Yasui
    • 13
  • Kieran O’Doherty
    • 14
  • Gloria M. Petersen
    • 9
  • Cornelia M. Ulrich
    • 4
    • 15
  • Ilona Csizmadi
    • 16
  • Ernest K. Amankwah
    • 16
  • Nigel T. Brockton
    • 16
  • Karen Kopciuk
    • 16
  • S. Elizabeth McGregor
    • 16
  • Linda E. Kelemen
    • 16
  1. 1.The Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.International Prevention Research InstituteLyonFrance
  3. 3.Institute For Public Health, Washington University In St LouisSt. LouisUSA
  4. 4.Division of Public Health SciencesFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Cancer Research Center, University of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  6. 6.Department of Population Health ResearchAlberta Health Services—Cancer CareEdmontonCanada
  7. 7.Digestive Disease Research CenterShariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  8. 8.National Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  9. 9.Department of Health Sciences ResearchCollege of Medicine, Mayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  10. 10.Department of Preventive MedicineSeoul National University College of MedicineChongno-guKorea
  11. 11.School of Environmental HealthUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  12. 12.Cancer Control Research Program, BC Cancer AgencyVancouverCanada
  13. 13.School of Public HealthUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  14. 14.W. Maurice Young Centre for Applied EthicsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  15. 15.German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT)HeidelbergGermany
  16. 16.Department of Population Health ResearchAlberta Health Services-Cancer CareCalgaryCanada

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