Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 273–282 | Cite as

Dietary patterns and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a German case–control study

  • Katharina Buck
  • Alina Vrieling
  • Dieter Flesch-Janys
  • Jenny Chang-Claude
Original paper

Abstract

Objective

Dietary patterns have been inconsistently associated with breast cancer risk. We assessed dietary patterns in association with postmenopausal breast cancer risk using an exploratory approach.

Methods

In a case–control study on postmenopausal breast cancer risk, including incident breast cancer cases (aged 50–74 years) diagnosed between 2002 and 2005 in Germany, information from a food frequency questionnaire among 2,884 cases and 5,509 controls was used for the identification of dietary patterns using principal component factor analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for potential confounders for the highest versus the lowest quintile of dietary pattern score.

Results

Two major dietary patterns were identified, i.e., a “healthy” (including high vegetable and vegetable oil intake) and an “unhealthy” (including high meat and deep-frying fat intake) dietary pattern. Overall, no associations between the dietary patterns and breast cancer risk were observed (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.88, 1.23) and OR = 0.96, 95% CI = (0.81, 1.13), respectively). Associations did not differ by ER/PR status, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy use, education, energy intake, and smoking status.

Conclusion

In conclusion, we did not find an association of a “healthy” or “unhealthy” dietary pattern with postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

Keywords

Breast cancer Dietary pattern Postmenopausal 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to all participants and clinical colleagues for supporting the study. We thank U. Eilber and D. Zoller for data management and dietary data calculation. Further, we thank R. Birr and S. Behrens for technical support. KB is funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Graduiertenkolleg 793. The “Deutsche Krebshilfe e.V.” is funding the MARIE study (grant number 70-2892-BR I).

Conflict of interest

No conflicts of financial or personal interest in any company or organization are reported.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katharina Buck
    • 1
  • Alina Vrieling
    • 1
  • Dieter Flesch-Janys
    • 2
  • Jenny Chang-Claude
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Genetic Epidemiology, Division of Cancer EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Center for Experimental MedicineUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany

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