Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 20, Issue 8, pp 1355–1362

Television viewing time and weight gain in colorectal cancer survivors: a prospective population-based study

  • Katrien Wijndaele
  • Brigid M. Lynch
  • Neville Owen
  • David W. Dunstan
  • Stephen Sharp
  • Joanne F. Aitken
Original Paper
  • 225 Downloads

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the prospective relationships between television viewing time and weight gain in the 3 years following colorectal cancer diagnosis for 1,867 colorectal cancer survivors (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 kg/m2).

Methods

BMI, television viewing time, physical activity, and socio-demographic and clinical covariates were assessed at baseline (5 months), 24 months and 36 months post-diagnosis. Multiple linear regression was used to study independent associations between baseline television viewing time and BMI at 24 and 36 months post-diagnosis.

Results

At both follow-up time points, there was a significant increase in mean BMI for participants reporting ≥5 h/day of television viewing compared to those watching <3 h/day at baseline (24 months: 0.72 kg/m2 (0.31, 1.12), p < 0.001; 36 months: 0.61 kg/m2 (0.14, 1.07), p = 0.01), independent of baseline BMI, gender, age, education, marital status, smoking, cancer site, cancer disease stage, treatment mode and co-morbidities. Additional adjustment for baseline physical activity did not change results.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that a greater emphasis on decreasing television viewing time could help reduce weight gain among colorectal cancer survivors. This, in turn, could contribute to a risk reduction for co-morbid conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Keywords

Colorectal neoplasms Body mass index Health behavior Longitudinal studies 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrien Wijndaele
    • 1
  • Brigid M. Lynch
    • 2
  • Neville Owen
    • 3
  • David W. Dunstan
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Stephen Sharp
    • 1
  • Joanne F. Aitken
    • 2
  1. 1.MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic ScienceCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Viertel Centre for Research in Cancer Control, The Cancer Council QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.Cancer Prevention Research Centre, School of Population HealthThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  4. 4.Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes InstituteMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.Vario Health InstituteEdith Cowan UniversityPerthAustralia

Personalised recommendations