Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 20, Issue 8, pp 1517–1521

Family cancer history affecting risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective cohort of Chinese women

  • Gwen Murphy
  • Xiao-Ou Shu
  • Yu-Tang Gao
  • Bu-Tian Ji
  • Michael Blaise Cook
  • Gong Yang
  • Hong Lan Li
  • Nathaniel Rothman
  • Wei Zheng
  • Wong-Ho Chow
Brief report

Abstract

An elevated risk of colorectal cancer has been associated with sporadic colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives, mostly in Western populations. Limited data exist from traditionally low-risk areas, such as Asia, where the prevalence of risk factors may differ. We examined the association of family history of cancer and subsequent colorectal cancer risk in a cohort of traditionally low-risk Chinese women. We followed 73,358 women in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study for cancer incidence until December 2005. After an average of 7 years of follow-up, 391 women were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. We calculated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, smoking, family income, education, body mass index, physical activity, and history of diabetes. We observed a significant association between colorectal cancer risk and history of a parent being diagnosed with colorectal cancer (hazard ratio: 3.34; 95% confidence interval: 1.58, 7.06). No association was observed for colorectal cancer diagnosed among siblings. Colorectal cancer risk was not influenced by a positive family history of cancer generally or any of the other cancers investigated (lung, breast, prostate, gastric, esophageal, endometrial, ovarian, urinary tract, central nervous system, and small bowel). Our cohort results suggest that consistent with findings from Western populations, having a family history of colorectal cancer may influence colorectal cancer risk to a similar extent in a low-risk population.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer Cohort studies Family history 

Abbreviations

BMI

Body mass index

CI

Confidence interval

CRC

Colorectal cancer

HR

Hazard ratio

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Copyright information

© US Government 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gwen Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiao-Ou Shu
    • 4
  • Yu-Tang Gao
    • 5
  • Bu-Tian Ji
    • 2
  • Michael Blaise Cook
    • 2
  • Gong Yang
    • 4
  • Hong Lan Li
    • 5
  • Nathaniel Rothman
    • 2
  • Wei Zheng
    • 4
  • Wong-Ho Chow
    • 2
  1. 1.Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive OncologyNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Infection and Immunoepidemiology Branch, DCEGNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer CenterVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  5. 5.Shanghai Cancer InstituteShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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