Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 19, Issue 10, pp 1259–1266 | Cite as

Hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer: a hospital-based case–control study

  • Lindsay Magura
  • Richelle Blanchard
  • Brian Hope
  • James R. Beal
  • Gary G. Schwartz
  • Abe E. Sahmoun
Original Paper

Abstract

Objective

High levels of serum cholesterol have been proposed to increase the risk of prostate cancer but the epidemiologic evidence is limited.

Methods

We conducted a hospital-based case–control study in Fargo, ND, USA, to examine the association between hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer. Cases were men with incident, histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Controls were men without clinical cancer who were seen at the same hospital for an annual physical exam. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients’ medical charts.

Results

From a patient population aged 50 to 74 years old, we obtained data on 312 White cases and 319 White controls. Hypercholesterolemia was defined as total cholesterol greater than 5.17 (mmol/l). Univariate logistic regression showed a significant association between hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19–2.27). This association changed only slightly after adjustment for age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index, type 2 diabetes, smoking, and multivitamin use (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.11–2.24). A significant association was found between low HDL and prostate cancer (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.04–2.36). High LDL was associated with a 60% increased risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.09–2.34). Compared to never smokers, current smokers had an 84% increased risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.09–3.13).

Conclusion

This study adds to recent evidence that hypercholesterolemia may increase the risk of prostate cancer in white men.

Keywords

Prostate cancer Hypercholesterolemia Lipid profiles Epidemiology Statins 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lindsay Magura
    • 1
  • Richelle Blanchard
    • 1
  • Brian Hope
    • 1
  • James R. Beal
    • 2
  • Gary G. Schwartz
    • 3
  • Abe E. Sahmoun
    • 4
  1. 1.University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health SciencesGrand ForksUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family and Community MedicineUniversity of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health SciencesGrand ForksUSA
  3. 3.Department of Cancer BiologyWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  4. 4.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health SciencesFargoUSA

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