Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 19, Issue 10, pp 1065–1076 | Cite as

The Pathways Study: a prospective study of breast cancer survivorship within Kaiser Permanente Northern California

  • Marilyn L. Kwan
  • Christine B. Ambrosone
  • Marion M. Lee
  • Janice Barlow
  • Sarah E. Krathwohl
  • Isaac Joshua Ergas
  • Christine H. Ashley
  • Julie R. Bittner
  • Jeanne Darbinian
  • Keren Stronach
  • Bette J. Caan
  • Warren Davis
  • Susan E. Kutner
  • Charles P. Quesenberry
  • Carol P. Somkin
  • Barbara Sternfeld
  • John K. Wiencke
  • Shichun Zheng
  • Lawrence H. Kushi
Original Paper

Abstract

Objective

With 2.3 million breast cancer survivors in the US today, identification of modifiable factors associated with breast cancer recurrence and survival is increasingly important. Only recently new studies have been designed to examine the impact of lifestyle factors on prognosis, including Pathways, a prospective study of women with breast cancer in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC).

Methods

Pathways aims to examine the effect on recurrence and survival of (1) lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, quality of life, and use of alternative therapies and (2) molecular factors such as genetic polymorphisms involved in metabolism of chemotherapeutic agents. Eligibility includes any woman diagnosed with invasive breast cancer within KPNC, no previous diagnosis of other invasive cancer, age 21 years or older, and ability to speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, or Mandarin. Newly diagnosed patients are identified daily from electronic pathology records and are enrolled within two months of diagnosis. An extensive baseline interview is conducted, blood and saliva samples are collected, and body measurements are taken. Women are followed for lifestyle updates, treatment, and outcomes by self-report and query of KPNC databases.

Results

Recruitment began in 9 January, 2006, and as of 16 January, 2008, 1,539 women have been enrolled along with collection of 1,323 blood samples (86%) and 1,398 saliva samples (91%).

Conclusions

The Pathways Study will become a rich resource to examine behavioral and molecular factors and breast cancer prognosis.

Keywords

Breast cancer Prognosis Prospective cohort study Diet Complementary and alternative therapy Quality of life 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn L. Kwan
    • 1
  • Christine B. Ambrosone
    • 2
  • Marion M. Lee
    • 3
  • Janice Barlow
    • 4
  • Sarah E. Krathwohl
    • 1
  • Isaac Joshua Ergas
    • 1
  • Christine H. Ashley
    • 1
  • Julie R. Bittner
    • 1
  • Jeanne Darbinian
    • 1
  • Keren Stronach
    • 1
  • Bette J. Caan
    • 1
  • Warren Davis
    • 2
  • Susan E. Kutner
    • 5
  • Charles P. Quesenberry
    • 1
  • Carol P. Somkin
    • 1
  • Barbara Sternfeld
    • 1
  • John K. Wiencke
    • 6
  • Shichun Zheng
    • 6
  • Lawrence H. Kushi
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of ResearchKaiser PermanenteOaklandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Cancer Prevention and ControlRoswell Park Cancer InstituteBuffaloUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Zero Breast CancerSan RafaelUSA
  5. 5.Department of SurgeryKaiser Permanente Santa TeresaSan JoseUSA
  6. 6.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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