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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 645–654 | Cite as

Occupation and risk of lung cancer in Central and Eastern Europe: the IARC multi-center case–control study

  • Alicja Bardin-MikolajczakEmail author
  • Jolanta Lissowska
  • David Zaridze
  • Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska
  • Peter Rudnai
  • Eleonora Fabianova
  • Dana Mates
  • Marie Navratilova
  • Vladimir Bencko
  • Vladimir Janout
  • Joelle Fevotte
  • Tony Fletcher
  • Andrea ‘t Mannetje
  • Paul Brennan
  • Paolo Boffetta
Article

Abstract

Objective

We sought to evaluate the role of occupation and industry in lung carcinogenesis in six countries in Central and Eastern Europe.

Methods

This multi-center case–control study included 2,056 male and 576 female lung cancer incidence cases diagnosed from 1998 to 2001 and 2,144 male and 727 female controls frequency-matched for sex and age. Unconditional regression models were applied to calculate the odds ratios after controlling for potential confounders including age (5-year groups), study center (15 centers), and tobacco pack-years.

Results

Elevated odds ratios (ORs) were found for men employed as production workers (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.22–1.72), bookkeepers and cashiers (1.81, 1.03–3.24), general farmers (1.67, 1.08–2.60), livestock workers (2.54, 1.09–5.88), miners (2.17, 1.47–3.23), toolmakers and metal patternmakers (2.56, 1.34–4.94), glass formers (2.55, 1.18–5.50), dockworkers, and freight handlers (1.49, 1.04–2.12). Industries with elevated risk among men included mining (1.75, 1.20–2.57), manufacture of cement, lime, or plaster (3.62, 1.11–12.00), casting of metals (2.00, 1.17–3.45), manufacture of electric motors (2.18, 1.24–3.86). For women, elevated ORs were found for medical, dental, veterinary doctors (2.54, 1.01–6.31), librarians and curators (7.03, 1.80–27.80), sewers 3.63 (1.12–10.23).

Conclusions

This study identifies new areas for further, explanatory analyses, especially in production work, and indicates new possible sources of exposure to cancer risk for women.

Keywords

Lung cancer Occupational exposures ISCO NACE Classifications 

Abbreviations

CI

Confidence interval

OR

Odds ratio

ISCO

International Standard Classification of Occupations

NACE

Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge financial support from European Commission (DG-XII), contract no. IC15-CT96-0313. This work has been supported by a UICC International Cancer Technology Transfer Fellowship. The Warsaw part of this study was supported by local grant from The Polish State Committee for Scientific Research, grant no. SPUB-M-COPERNICUS/P-05/DZ-30/99/2000. John Daniel (IARC) edited the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alicja Bardin-Mikolajczak
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jolanta Lissowska
    • 1
  • David Zaridze
    • 2
  • Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska
    • 3
  • Peter Rudnai
    • 4
  • Eleonora Fabianova
    • 5
  • Dana Mates
    • 6
  • Marie Navratilova
    • 7
  • Vladimir Bencko
    • 8
  • Vladimir Janout
    • 9
  • Joelle Fevotte
    • 10
  • Tony Fletcher
    • 11
  • Andrea ‘t Mannetje
    • 12
  • Paul Brennan
    • 12
  • Paolo Boffetta
    • 12
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Cancer PreventionCancer Center & Institute of OncologyWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Institute of CarcinogenesisCancer Research CenterMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyInstitute of Occupational MedicineLodzPoland
  4. 4.Division of Environmental Health AssessmentNational Institute of Environmental HealthBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Specialized State Health InstituteBanska BystricaSlovakia
  6. 6.Institute of Hygiene, Public Health, Health Services and ManagementBucharestRomania
  7. 7.Department of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsMasaryk Memorial Cancer InstituteBrnoCzech Republic
  8. 8.Institute of Hygiene and EpidemiologyCharles University, First Faculty of MedicinePragueCzech Republic
  9. 9.Department of Preventive MedicinePalacky University Faculty of MedicineOlomoucCzech Republic
  10. 10.Institute of Occupational MedicineClaude Bernard UniversityLyonFrance
  11. 11.Environmental Epidemiology UnitLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineLondonUK
  12. 12.International Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance

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