Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 735–742

Colorectal cancer screening behavior and health insurance status (United States)

  • B. Alex Matthews
  • Ruric C. Anderson
  • Ann B. Nattinger
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-005-1228-z

Cite this article as:
Matthews, B.A., Anderson, R.C. & Nattinger, A.B. Cancer Causes Control (2005) 16: 735. doi:10.1007/s10552-005-1228-z

Abstract

Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the association between health insurance status and CRC screening behavior among a diverse sample of ambulatory patients.

Methods: Cross-sectional, retrospective study. Quota sampling techniques were used to recruit 52 insured/uninsured patients ≥age 50 from three Midwestern medical clinics (N=104). Data were collected by interviewer-administered CRC screening questionnaires.

Results: Thirty-nine percent of the sample was in compliance with CRC testing guidelines. Insured compared to uninsured participants were significantly more likely to have ever completed any testing (77% versus 33%), and were more likely to have undertaken testing according to current US guidelines (62% versus 17%), all ps < 0.001. Insured participants also were significantly more likely than the uninsured to know about, receive physician recommendation to screen, and profess future intent to screen, ps < 0.001. Fewer uninsured participants were tested for routine reasons compared to insured participants. Significant group differences did not emerge on future preference for a particular screening methodology, if testing costs were equal.

Conclusions: Results suggest that CRC screening depends, in part, on health insurance status. Increasing insurance coverage or resources for low-cost, accurate tests may facilitate future screening.

Keywords

cancer prevention colonoscopy colorectal cancer screening fecal occult blood test flexible sigmoidoscopy health insurance 

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Alex Matthews
    • 1
  • Ruric C. Anderson
    • 1
  • Ann B. Nattinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Policy InstituteCenter for Patient Care and Outcomes ResearchMilwaukeeUSA

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