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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 16, Supplement 1, pp 15–25 | Cite as

Using Data to Motivate Action: The Need for High Quality, an Effective Presentation, and an Action Context for Decision-making

  • Bruce L. BlackEmail author
  • Rebecca Cowens-Alvarado
  • Susan Gershman
  • Hannah K. Weir
Article

Abstract

Three common barriers to the effective use of data to inform decisions and motivate action for the planning of cancer control are (1) failure to recognize the availability of high-quality data, (2) not presenting the data in a compelling format, and (3) failing to place the data in a historical and action context. Overcoming these barriers will go a long way toward demonstrating that high-quality data can be used to accomplish the desired outcomes in a Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) program. The article identifies existing sources of high-quality data, provides examples of effective presentation, and discusses successes in using data for program planning and implementation. The paper is not meant to provide a comprehensive discussion of using data for decision making, instead providing options to help key CCC stakeholders improve the effectiveness of their decisions as CCC plans are developed and implemented.

Key words

comprehensive cancer control action context outcomes intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce L. Black
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rebecca Cowens-Alvarado
    • 1
  • Susan Gershman
    • 2
  • Hannah K. Weir
    • 3
  1. 1.American Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Department of Public HealthMassachusetts Cancer RegistryUSA
  3. 3.Centers for Disease Control & PreventionUSA

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