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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 437–447 | Cite as

Occupational risks for uveal melanoma results from a case-control study in nine European countries

  • Jean-Michel Lutz
  • Ian Cree
  • Svend Sabroe
  • Tine Kajsa Kvist
  • Lene Bjørk Clausen
  • Noemia Afonso
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
  • Terri J. Ballard
  • Janine Bell
  • Diane Cyr
  • Mikael Eriksson
  • Joëlle Févotte
  • Pascal Guénel
  • Lennart Hardell
  • Karl-Heinz Jöckel
  • Ana Miranda
  • Franco Merletti
  • Maria M. Morales-Suarez-Varela
  • Aivars Stengrevics
  • Elsebeth Lynge
Article

Abstract

Objective Uveal melanoma is a rare disease with poor prognosis and largely unknown etiology. We studied potential occupational risk factors.

Methods A population based case-control study was undertaken during 1995–1997 in nine European countries using population and colon cancer controls with personal interviews. Occupational exposure to sunlight and artificial UV radiation was assessed with a job exposure matrix. In total, 320 uveal melanoma cases were eligible at pathology review, and 292 cases were interviewed, participation 91%. Out of 3357 population controls, 2062 were interviewed, 61%, and out of 1272 cancer controls 1094 were interviewed, 86%.

Results Using population controls, occupational exposure to sunlight was not associated with an increased risk (RR=1.24, 95% CI=0.88−1.74), while an excess risk found with use of colon cancer controls was attributed to confounding factors. An excess risk in welders was restricted to the French part of the data. Cooks, RR=2.40; cleaners, RR 2.15; and laundry workers, RR=3.14, were at increased risk of uveal melanoma.

Conclusion Our study does overall not support an association between occupational sunlight exposure and risk of uveal melanoma. The finding of an excess risk of eye melanoma in cooks in several European countries is intriguing.

Keywords

case-control study eye Malignant melanoma 

Abbreviations

CI

Confidence interval

ICD-O

International classification of diseases for oncology

ISCO

International Standard Classification of Occupation

JEM

Job exposure matrix

NOS

Not otherwise specified

NR

Not relevant

Obs

Observed number of cases

RR

Relative risk

UK

United Kingdom

US

United States

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-Michel Lutz
    • 1
  • Ian Cree
    • 2
  • Svend Sabroe
    • 3
  • Tine Kajsa Kvist
    • 4
  • Lene Bjørk Clausen
    • 4
  • Noemia Afonso
    • 5
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
    • 6
  • Terri J. Ballard
    • 7
  • Janine Bell
    • 8
  • Diane Cyr
    • 9
  • Mikael Eriksson
    • 10
  • Joëlle Févotte
    • 11
  • Pascal Guénel
    • 12
  • Lennart Hardell
    • 13
  • Karl-Heinz Jöckel
    • 14
  • Ana Miranda
    • 15
  • Franco Merletti
    • 16
  • Maria M. Morales-Suarez-Varela
    • 17
  • Aivars Stengrevics
    • 18
  • Elsebeth Lynge
    • 4
  1. 1.Registre Genevois des TumeursGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Queen Alexandra HospitalTranslational Oncology Research CentrePortsmouthUK
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Social MedicineUniversity of AarhusDenmark
  4. 4.Institute of Public HealthUniversity of CopenhagenKøbenhavn NDenmark
  5. 5.Serviço de Bioestatística e Informática Médica, Al. Hernani MonteiroPortoPortugal
  6. 6.Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social MedicineBremenGermany
  7. 7.The Venetian Tumour RegistryPaduaItaly
  8. 8.Thames Cancer RegistryLondonUK
  9. 9.INSERM Unité 88Saint MauriceFrance
  10. 10.Department of OncologyUniversity HospitalLundSweden
  11. 11.Institut Universitaire de Médecine du TravailUniversité Claude BernardLyonFrance
  12. 12.INSERM Unité 170VillejuifFrance
  13. 13.Department of OncologyUniversity HospitalÖrebroSweden
  14. 14.Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and EpidemiologyUniversity Clinics of EssenGermany
  15. 15.Instituto Portuquès de Oncologia de Francisco GentilLisboaPortugal
  16. 16.Unit of Cancer EpidemiologyUniversity of Turin, CERMS and CPOPiemonteItaly
  17. 17.Unit of Public HealthValencia University, Dr. Peset University HospitalSpain
  18. 18.Latvia Cancer RegisterLatvia Oncology CentreRigaLatvia

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